Now showing items 21-40 of 15908

    • Integrating Suicide Prevention into the SBIRT Model

      McPherson, Tracy; Harris, Brett (2021-10)
      This is a set of slides from a presentation by Brett Harris - Assistant Professor at the University at Albany School of Public Health. The presenter addresses the issue of death rates in the US and compares them to suicidal ideation in adolescence as well as the number of drug overdoses in this age group. It is a wonderfully detailed set of slides on this topic that addresses Suicide as a Public Health Issue and introduces SAMHSA's Call to Action: Substance Use and Suicide: A Nexus requiring a Public Health Response.
    • Burnout: How it Affects You and Your Employees - and What to Do About It

      Gorter, Jeff; Saggau, Linda (2021-10-19)
      If stress remains unaddressed for a long period of time, it can erode the mental health and wellbeing of people by way of burnout—defined as physical, emotional, and mental exhaustion caused by long-term involvement in emotionally-demanding situations. Unfortunately, these days, burnout is rampant. According to an Indeed survey, 67% of people feel as if they are more burned out now than before the pandemic began. Burnout affects wellbeing and performance on three levels: 1) personal, 2) professional, and 3) organizational —making it critically important to address. In this webinar, you will learn to recognize the signs and symptoms of burnout (in your employees and yourself) and become acquainted with effective routes of support. This webinar features R3 Continuum’s Vice President of Crisis Response Clinical Services, Jeff Gorter, MSW, LMSW, who will be co-presenting with Linda Saggau, R3 Continuum’s Chief of Staff. Linda has been researching burnout for over fifteen years and is an expert in helping leaders and employees mitigate it in order to revitalize wellbeing and performance. They’ll provide expert insight on the impact of stress and burnout, in addition to practical advice for leaders.
    • Depression in the Workplace: What Can We Do

      VandePol, Bob (2021-09)
      Although you might not know it, depression touches everyone in the workplace. Affecting nearly one in ten adults each year, depression is one of the top reasons for lost productivity, sick days taken and disability leave. Unaddressed depression in the workplace can contribute to lower profits and morale as well as increased mistakes and accidents. Ignoring depression is no longer an option. Rather than be bystanders, everyone in the workplace can help to address this issue. Depression is a serious medical illness of the brain that affects a person’s mood, concentration, activity level, interests, appetite, social behavior and physical health. Although depression is treatable, oftentimes it is a lifelong condition with periods of wellness alternating with depressive recurrences.
    • The Claustrum Synaptically Connects Cortical Network Motifs in Mouse

      Qadir, Houman; Stewart, Brent W.; Wu, Qiong; VanRyzin, Jonathan W.; Teixeira da Silva, Joyce; Chen, Shuo; Seminowicz, David A.; Mathur, Brian N. (Brian Neil) (2021)
    • List of ALMACA / EAPA CEOs

      2021-10-08
      The Employee Assistance Professionals Association (EAPA) is the world’s largest and oldest membership organization for employee assistance professionals. With members in over 40 countries around the globe, EAPA is the world’s most relied upon source of information and support for and about the employee assistance profession. EAPA publishes the Journal of Employee Assistance, hosts the annual EAP Conference and EXPO, and offers training and other resources to fulfill its mission. EAPA’s mission is to promote the highest standards of EA practice and the continuing development of employee assistance professionals, programs and services. The first organizing meeting for the Association of Labor and Management Administrators and Consultants on Alcoholism (ALMACA) was held in April, 1971, and it was incorporated sometime later that year. The association's name was officially changed to Employee Assistance Professionals Association (EAPA) in 1989. The attached document is a list of the CEOs of this Association since its inception in 1971.
    • Innovations stemming the rising tide of substance use disorders

      Oss, Monica E. (Open Minds, 2021-10-04)
      This briefing from Open Minds focuses on the need for integrated mental health and substance use services with increased individual attention on treatment and recovery needs and a greater focus on outcomes of care. As treatment needs are assessed and considered, Oss (author) writes about challenges to addiction treatment including health disparities, gaps in continuum of care models, and ability to successfully leverage knowledge and technology. Examples of innovative thinking for integrated treatment supporting workplace behavioral health as well are discussed.
    • HS/HSL Connective Issues 2021-2022

      University of Maryland, Baltimore. Health Sciences and Human Services Library, 2022
    • Meeting the challenges of retention and enrollment of study participants in clinical trials during the COVID-19 pandemic from the study leadership perspective: Experience from the Zoster Eye Disease Study (ZEDS)

      Tom, MeeLee; Cohen, Elisabeth J; LopezJimenez, Carlos; Hochman, Judith S; Troxel, Andrea B; Jeng, Bennie H (Elsevier B.V., 2021-11-16)
      Purpose: To describe steps taken that enabled a high rate of retention and early resumption of enrollment in the Zoster Eye Disease Study (ZEDS), a randomized controlled trial funded by the National Eye Institute, during the first 13 months (3/1/2020-3/31/2021) of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A number of responses were implemented in ZEDS when the focus shifted to retention of study participants at the beginning of the pandemic including frequent communication with the participating clinical centers (PCCs) about remote visits, local lab work, shipping study medication, and completion of revised case report forms. Additional payments were provided to the PCCs. Remote activation of PCCs continued. Screening and enrollment visits gradually resumed when allowed. Results: Communication with PCCs increased, and average attendance at monthly coordinator teleconferences went up from 17 to 47. Remote visits peaked in April 2020, accounting for 75% (33/44) of study visits, then declined to less than 10% of study visits beginning August 2020. Overall, 97% (590/609) of study visits were completed. Only 5.5% (9/165) of study participants withdrew consent, and 2.4% (4/165) were lost to follow-up. Enrollment returned to pre-pandemic levels by September 2020. Discussion: Strong communication and unwavering commitment, combined with the technological capability for remote work, visits, and shipment of study medication, were key to the successful retention of study participants and resumption of enrollment. Conclusions: Rapid responses to challenges to trials caused by the COVID-19 pandemic can enable them to continue successfully and provide insights into the planning of future trials.
    • Acute on Chronic Liver Failure: Factors Associated With Transplantation

      Goussous, Naeem; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Talan; Malik, Saad; Alvarez-Casas, Josue; Gray, Stephen H; Barth, Rolf N; Thuluvath, Paul J; LaMattina, John C (Wolters Kluwer Health, 2021-11-17)
      Background: Acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) carries a poor prognosis unless liver transplantation is offered. We present risk factors associated with proceeding with liver transplantation in patients with ACLF. Methods: A retrospective review of all patients with ACLF who presented to a single transplant center between January 2016 and December 2017 was performed. We compared patients who were transplanted with patients who were not. Results: During the study period, 144 patients with ACLF were identified, 86 patients (59.7%) were transplanted, and 58 were not. The transplanted patients had a lower number of failed organs (4 versus 5, P < 0.001) and lower incidence of ACLF grade 3 (76.7% versus 94.8%, P = 0.014) compared with nontransplanted patients. Liver transplantation offered a 1-y survival of 86% as compared to 12% in the nontransplanted group. Hospital charges were significantly higher among transplanted patients as compared with the nontransplanted patients ($227 886 versus $88 900, P < 0.001). Elevated serum lactate was a risk factor in not offering liver transplantation in ACLF patients. Conclusions: In appropriately selected patients with ACLF, liver transplantation is feasible and can provide above 86% 1-y patient survival even in grade 3 ACLF.
    • Development of a Culturally Sensitive Asian American/Pacific Islander Curriculum for Child Psychiatry Trainees.

      Han, Crystal; Chou, Shinnyi; Shaligram, Deepika; Chan, Vivien; Song, Suzan; Edwards, Sarah; Gordon-Achebe, Kimberly (Springer Nature, 2021-11-19)
    • Letter from Eugene F. Cordell to Christine Turner Cordell on November 29, 2861

      Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, 1843-1913 (1861-11-29)
      In this letter, Eugene F. Cordell writes to his mother, Christine T. Cordell describing the wet conditions in camp as well as his purchase of clothing for the winter. He also describes a trip to purchase food supplies in the country.
    • Letter from Eugene F. Cordell to Christine Turner Cordell on November 4, 1861

      Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, 1843-1913 (1861-11-04)
      In this letter, Eugene F. Cordell writes to his mother, Christine T. Cordell about camp life. He describes the cost of food and living as well as the sicknesses ravaging the troops. He also responds to questions asked in his parent's recent letters.
    • HSHSL COVID-19 Telework Weekly Email Updates: November 2021

      Tooey, M.J. (2021-11)
      The COVID-19 Pandemic began in Maryland in March 2020, as a result the University of Maryland, Baltimore went to telework. Mandatory telework ended June 2021. These emails reflect the HSHSL's decisions surrounding COVID-19 and the accomplishments for November 2021.
    • HSHSL COVID-19 Telework Weekly Email Updates: October 2021

      Tooey, M.J. (2021-10)
      The COVID-19 Pandemic began in Maryland in March 2020, as a result the University of Maryland, Baltimore went to telework. Mandatory telework ended June 2021. These emails reflect the HSHSL's decisions surrounding COVID-19 and the accomplishments for October 2021.
    • HSHSL COVID-19 Telework Weekly Email Updates: September 2021

      Tooey, M.J.; Nguyen, Tony; Mayo, Alexa A. (2021-09)
      The COVID-19 Pandemic began in Maryland in March 2020, as a result the University of Maryland, Baltimore went to telework. Mandatory telework ended June 2021. These emails reflect the HSHSL's decisions surrounding COVID-19 and the accomplishments for September 2021.
    • HSHSL COVID-19 Telework Weekly Email Updates: August 2021

      Tooey, M.J. (2021-08)
      The COVID-19 Pandemic began in Maryland in March 2020, as a result the University of Maryland, Baltimore went to telework. These emails reflect the HSHSL's decisions surrounding COVID-19 and the accomplishments for August 2021.
    • Letter from Eugene F. Cordell to his Parents, Levi O. and Christine T. Cordell on December 11, 1861

      Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, 1843-1913 (1861-12-11)
      In this letter, Eugene F. Cordell writes to his parents about his change in orders to march to South Carolina instead of Bowling Green, Kentucky. He talks about his financial situation and his lack of appropriate clothing. He describes a court martial over a deserter and the hospitality in the town of Salem.
    • Letter from Eugene F. Cordell to Christine Turner Cordell on December 10, 1861

      Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, 1843-1913 (1861-12-10)
      In this letter, Eugene F. Cordell writes to his mother, Christine T. Cordell describing the march from his camp in Greenbrier to Salem. He describes the cost of living and his lack of clothing and money. He has hopes for a Cadetship.