Now showing items 21-40 of 18866

    • Why Belonging Matters: When employees feel comfortable bringing their authentic selves to work, companies thrive culturally and financially

      Gonzales, Matt (SHRM, 2022-10-15)
      Research has shown that lacking a sense of belonging at work can be more distressing to employees than being harassed An environment where workers feel uncomfortable being themselves can create trust issues, diminish an employee's self-worth and erode workplace culture. This article details the role of belonging in the workplace and includes personal experiences from employees.
    • Lecture 33: Intermittent Fever by John C.S. Monkur

      Monkur, John C.S. (1)
      Handwritten lecture notes on Intermittent Fever continuing lecture 31 on the same subject given by Dr. John C.S. Monkur, Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine at the Washington University of Baltimore Medical School. Volume is part of the Dr. Milford “Mickey” M. Foxwell, Jr.’s Collection of Lecture Notes. The notes are available in the Internet Archive, see link.
    • Lecture 31: Intermittent Fever by John C.S. Monkur

      Monkur, John C.S. (1)
      Handwritten lecture notes on Intermittent Fever given by Dr. John C.S. Monkur, Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine at the Washington University of Baltimore Medical School. Volume is part of the Dr. Milford “Mickey” M. Foxwell, Jr.’s Collection of Lecture Notes. The notes are available in the Internet Archive, see link.
    • Lecture 5th: Continued Fever by John C.S. Monkur

      Monkur, John C.S. (1)
      Handwritten lecture notes on Fever continuing another lecture given by Dr. John C.S. Monkur, Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine at the Washington University of Baltimore Medical School. Volume is part of the Dr. Milford “Mickey” M. Foxwell, Jr.’s Collection of Lecture Notes. The notes are available in the Internet Archive, see link.
    • Lecture 22nd: Broussais Theory of Fever by John C.S. Monkur

      Monkur, John C.S. (1)
      Handwritten lecture notes on Francois Joseph Victor Broussais' Thoery of Fever given by Dr. John C.S. Monkur, Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine at the Washington University of Baltimore Medical School. Volume is part of the Dr. Milford “Mickey” M. Foxwell, Jr.’s Collection of Lecture Notes. The notes are available in the Internet Archive, see link.
    • Lecture 17th: Lecture on Prognosis Continued by John C.S. Monkur

      Monkur, John C.S. (1)
      Handwritten lecture notes on prognosis by Dr. John C.S. Monkur, Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine at the Washington University of Baltimore Medical School. Volume is part of the Dr. Milford “Mickey” M. Foxwell, Jr.’s Collection of Lecture Notes. The notes are available in the Internet Archive, see link.
    • History of Pathology, Present State of Medicine, Lectures 2 & 3, by John C.S. Monkur, 1845

      Monkur, John C.S. (1845)
      Handwritten lecture notes on the History of Pathology and the Present State of Medicine by Dr. John C.S. Monkur, Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine at the Washington University of Baltimore Medical School. Volume is part of the Dr. Milford “Mickey” M. Foxwell, Jr.’s Collection of Lecture Notes. The notes are available in the Internet Archive, see link.
    • Lecture: Prognosis by John C.S. Monkur

      Monkur, John C.S. (1)
      Handwritten lecture notes on Prognosis by Dr. John C.S. Monkur, Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine at the Washington University of Baltimore Medical School. Volume is part of the Dr. Milford “Mickey” M. Foxwell, Jr.’s Collection of Lecture Notes. The notes are available in the Internet Archive, see link.
    • The Table Podcast (Jan.-Mar. 2023)

      Ferreira, Rosemary; Carney, Courtney Jones (2023)
    • President's Message 2023

      Jarrell, Bruce E. (2023)
    • Approaching Leadership to Advocate for Physician Well-Being Programs

      Wolf, Mary (VITAL WorkLife, 2022-11-29)
      Today’s physicians are under profound stress. It’s more than the normal stress of dealing with disease, injury and disability; it’s compounded by many factors including understaffing, overwork, the demands of electronic record-keeping, aging patients with complex conditions, shifting sets of public-health challenges and much more. Nearly every physician on the front line is affected by these stressors and sees their effect on colleagues which can range from irritability to burnout, depression to substance abuse. Many want to do something about the situation. But what can they do? Executive coach and burnout/well-being expert Mary Wolf has an answer: they can become advocates of physician well being. In a detailed article, Wolf outlines the ways any physician can begin to advocate for an accessible, effective, robust well-being program in their organization. One that offers peer counseling, therapy and other support offerings while ensuring confidentiality. She lays out a path from awareness of the problem to concrete action, including whom to contact if you have concerns about stress, morale and possible burnout; who in the organization are in the best position to make a well-being program happen; how to make the best possible arguments for such a program to leadership; how to join with other concerned physicians and with the HR professionals who deal with employee crises daily to make your case; and much more.
    • Estimated Deaths Attributable to Excessive Alcohol Use Among US Adults Aged 20 to 64 Years, 2015 to 2019

      Esser, Marissa B.; Leung, Gregory; Sherk, Adam; Bohm, Michele K.; Liu, Yong, M.D.; Lu, Hua, M.S.; Naimi, Timothy S. (JAMA Network, 2022-11-01)
      IMPORTANCE: Alcohol consumption is a leading preventable cause of death in the US, and death rates from fully alcohol-attributable causes (eg, alcoholic liver disease) have increased in the past decade, including among adults aged 20 to 64 years. However, a comprehensive assessment of alcohol-attributable deaths among this population, including from partially alcohol-attributable causes, is lacking. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mean annual number of deaths from excessive alcohol use relative to total deaths among adults aged 20 to 64 years overall; by sex, age group, and state; and as a proportion of total deaths. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This population-based cross-sectional study of mean annual alcohol-attributable deaths among US residents between January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2019, used population-attributable fractions. Data were analyzed from January 6, 2021, to May 2, 2022. EXPOSURES: Mean daily alcohol consumption among the 2 089 287 respondents to the 2015-2019 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System was adjusted using national per capita alcohol sales to correct for underreporting. Adjusted mean daily alcohol consumption prevalence estimates were applied to relative risks to generate alcohol-attributable fractions for chronic partially alcohol attributable conditions. Alcohol-attributable fractions based on blood alcohol concentrations were used to assess acute partially alcohol-attributable deaths. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Alcohol-attributable deaths for 58 causes of death, as defined in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Alcohol-Related Disease Impact application. Mortality data were from the National Vital Statistics System. RESULTS: During the 2015-2019 study period, of 694 660 mean deaths per year among adults aged 20 to 64 years (men: 432 575 [66.3%]; women: 262 085 [37.7%]), an estimated 12.9% (89 697 per year) were attributable to excessive alcohol consumption. This percentage was higher among men (15.0%) than women (9.4%). By state, alcohol-attributable deaths ranged from 9.3% of total deaths in Mississippi to 21.7% in New Mexico. Among adults aged 20 to 49 years, alcohol-attributable deaths (44 981 mean annual deaths) accounted for an estimated 20.3% of total deaths. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: The findings of this cross-sectional study suggest that an estimated 1 in 8 total deaths among US adults aged 20 to 64 years were attributable to excessive alcohol use, including 1 in 5 deaths among adults aged 20 to 49 years. The number of premature deaths could be reduced with increased implementation of evidenced-based, population-level alcohol policies, such as increasing alcohol taxes or regulating alcohol outlet density.
    • Impact of Family Development on Family Health and Well-Being: Findings from a three-year study of Colorado's Family Pathways Framework

      OMNI Institute, 2022-07
      From 2019 to 2022, OMNI partnered with the Family Resource Center Association (FRCA) to examine the impact of Family Resource Centers on the health and well-being of families. Three Colorado FRCA-member Family Resource Centers participated in the study. Key findings include increases in family economic security, resiliency, and health over a 9-month period. Additional research is needed to understand how these improvements compare to families not connected to a Family Resource Center.
    • The UMB Pulse Podcast: January - March 2023

      Schelle, Charles; Frick, Jena; Rampolla, Dana; Frieman, Matthew B. (2023)
    • The State of Mental Health in America 2023

      Reinert, Maddy; Nguyen, Theresa; Fritze, Danielle (Mental Health America, 2022-10)
      This chartbook presents a collection of data that provides a baseline for answering some questions about how many people in America need and have access to mental health services. This report is a companion to the online interactive data on the MHA website (www.mhanational.org/issues/state-mental-health-america). The data and tables include state and national data and shareable infographics.
    • CARTI: Center for Advanced Research Training & Innovation Newsletter 2023

      University of Maryland, Baltimore. School of Medicine, 2023
    • When Small is Big: Opportunities for EAP in the Small Size Employer Market in the United States

      Attridge, Mark (2022-12-09)
      Based on a recent article published in 2022 in the American Journal of Health Promotion, this presentation focuses on the business opportunities for EAPs in the small employer market. Small employers, defined as having less than 100 employees, are a major part of the workforce in the United States. All data is from year 2021 March reports. In the private sector, they currently represent 97.5% of all work establishments and the 69 million workers they employ constitute 52% of all of workers. In the public sector, small employers are 59.5% of all work establishments but account for less than 2% of the total workers in state and local government organizations. Every 1 in 3 small employers in the US now offer an employee assistance program (EAP) benefit. This is up substantially from just 1 in 7 in 1999 (14% vs. 33%). Thus, about 21.9 million employees working for small employers today have access to an EAP. A key question, however, is what kind of value small employers are getting from their EAP when the providers range from low use “free” programs embedded in other insurance benefits, digital only providers that do not support the workplace, or full-service EAPs.
    • Endogenous Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) Modulates Oxygen (O2) Dependent Control of Red Blood Cell (RBC) Energy Metabolism and Antioxidant Status

      Rogers, Stephen C. Ph.D.; Moitra, Parikshit Ph.D.; Brummet, Mary; Zohreh, Safari; Wang, Qihong; Okhuevbie, Joy; Anabaraonye, Nancy; Abdulmalik, Osheiza; Safo, Martin; Baer, Maria R.; et al. (2022-12-04)