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dc.contributor.authorEllis, E.C.
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-15T16:12:17Z
dc.date.available2019-07-15T16:12:17Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85031399321&doi=10.1177%2f0309133317736424&partnerID=40&md5=53a48036a7a1dafdd6f43c107873e5f4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9988
dc.description.abstractEven as it remains an informal term defining the emergence of humans as a force transforming Earth as a system, the Anthropocene is stimulating novel research and discussion across the academy and well beyond. While geography has always been deeply connected with the coupled human–environment paradigm, physical geographer’s embrace of the Anthropocene still appears lukewarm at best. While there are good reasons to hesitate, including the fact that the Anthropocene is not yet, and might never be, formalized in the Geologic Time Scale, physical geographers have much to gain by embracing what is rapidly becoming the most influential scholarly discussion on human–environmental relations in a generation. This editorial was commissioned for the author’s debut as Contributing Editor of Progress in Physical Geography. Copyright The Author(s) 2017.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.doi.org/10.1177/0309133317736424en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publications Ltden_US
dc.relation.ispartofProgress in Physical Geography
dc.subjectAnthropogenic global environmental changeen_US
dc.subjectbiogeographyen_US
dc.subjectclimatologyen_US
dc.subjectgeomorphologyen_US
dc.subjecthydrologyen_US
dc.subjectpedagogyen_US
dc.titlePhysical geography in the Anthropoceneen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0309133317736424


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