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dc.contributor.authorDu, Y.
dc.contributor.authorValentini, N.C.
dc.contributor.authorKim, M.J.
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-15T16:12:13Z
dc.date.available2019-07-15T16:12:13Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85014114786&doi=10.3389%2ffpsyg.2017.00158&partnerID=40&md5=c110f8461415fc635a91b4887924b64b
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9945
dc.description.abstractBoth children and adults can learn motor sequences quickly in one learning session, yet little is known about potential age-related processes that underlie this fast sequence acquisition. Here, we examined the progressive performance changes in a one-session modified serial reaction time task in 6-and 10-year-old children and adults. We found that rapid sequence learning, as reflected by reaction time (RT), was comparable between groups. The learning was expressed through two behavioral processes: online progressive changes in RT while the task was performed in a continuous manner and offline changes in RT that emerged following a short rest. These offline and online RT changes were age-related; learning in 6-year-olds was primarily reflected through the offline process. In contrast, learning in adults was reflected through the online process; and both online and offline processes occurred concurrently in 10-year-olds. Our results suggest that early rapid sequence learning has a developmental profile. Although the unifying mechanism underlying these two age-related processes is unclear, we discuss possible explanations that need to be systematically elucidated in future studies. Copyright 2017 Du, Valentini, Kim, Whitall and Clark.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00158en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Psychology
dc.subjectAge-relateden_US
dc.subjectDeclarative sequence knowledgeen_US
dc.subjectFast sequence learningen_US
dc.subjectFatigueen_US
dc.subjectImplicit sequence learningen_US
dc.subjectOffline processen_US
dc.subjectOnline processen_US
dc.subjectTask pacingen_US
dc.titleChildren and adults both learn motor sequences quickly, but do so differentlyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00158


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