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dc.contributor.authorPierce, B.
dc.contributor.authorBowden, B.
dc.contributor.authorMcCullagh, M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-15T16:12:12Z
dc.date.available2019-07-15T16:12:12Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85016394135&doi=10.1016%2fj.explore.2017.02.002&partnerID=40&md5=f835441aeec129ab713b5a6c64992c83
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9943
dc.description.abstractContext Physical inactivity, poor nutrition, and chronic stress threaten the health of African-American youth in urban environments. Conditions often worsen in summer with diminished access to healthy foods and safe venues for physical activity. Objective A public-private partnership was formed to develop and evaluate an integrative health intervention entitled "Mission Thrive Summer" (MTS). Methods The MTS setting was an urban farm and adjacent school in a low-income community in Baltimore, Maryland. The intervention included farming, nutrition education, cooking, physical activity, yoga, mindfulness, and employment. Mixed-methods outcomes evaluation was conducted. Quantitative measures included accelerometry and self-reported health behaviors, using the Child and Adolescent Mindfulness Measure, Perceived Stress Scale, Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents (PAQA), CDC Youth Risk Behavior Survey, and Block Kids Food Screener (BKFS). Outcomes were compared pre- and post-intervention using paired t-tests. Qualitative evaluation was based on participant and parent interviews. Participants In total, 36 African-American 9th- and 10th-grade students joined MTS (17 in 2013, 26 in 2014, and 7 participating both years). Results In total, 88% of participants completed MTS. Accelerometry revealed that participants took 7158 steps and burned 544 calories per day during MTS. Participants experienced statistically significant improvements in self-reported physical activity (PAQA) and dietary habits (BKFS). Surveys did not detect changes in stress or mindfulness (P >.05). Qualitative data demonstrated new knowledge and skills, increased self-efficacy, health behavior change, and program enjoyment. Conclusions MTS was feasible among African-American high school students in Baltimore. Mixed-methods outcomes evaluation provided preliminary evidence of health behavior change during the summer and at follow-up. Copyright 2017 The Authorsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis intervention and outcomes evaluation was funded by the Institute for Integrative Health, the Zanvyl and Isabelle Krieger Fund, and the National Institutes of Health, USA (T35 DK095737).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.doi.org/10.1016/j.explore.2017.02.002en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofExplore: The Journal of Science and Healing
dc.subjectAfrican-American youthen_US
dc.subjectcookingen_US
dc.subjectmeditationen_US
dc.subjectnutrition educationen_US
dc.subjectphysical activityen_US
dc.subjectsummeren_US
dc.subjecturban farmingen_US
dc.subjectyogaen_US
dc.titleA Summer Health Program for African-American High School Students in Baltimore, Maryland: Community Partnership for Integrative Healthen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.explore.2017.02.002
dc.identifier.pmid28373062


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