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dc.contributor.authorBertha, M.
dc.contributor.authorVasantharoopan, A.
dc.contributor.authorKumar, A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-21T18:46:32Z
dc.date.available2019-06-21T18:46:32Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85051411573&doi=10.1093%2fibd%2fizx021&partnerID=40&md5=008371ce7ef9f8676fa9ee384ec63a64
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9763
dc.description.abstractBackgrounds: Recent studies have identified the role of serologic markers in characterizing disease phenotype, location, complications, and severity among Northern Europeans (NE) with Crohn's disease (CD). However, very little is known about the role of serology in CD among African Americans (AA). Our study explored the relationship between serology and disease phenotype in AA with CD, while controlling for genetic ancestry. Methods: AAs with CD were enrolled as participants through multicenter collaborative efforts. Serological levels of IgA anti-Saccharomyces cervisiae antibody (ASCA), IgG ASCA, E. coli outermembrane porin C, anti-CBir1, and ANCA were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Genotyping was performed using Illumina immunochip technology; an admixture rate was calculated for each subject. Multiple imputation by chained equations was performed to account for data missing at random. Logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratio (OR) for associations between serological markers and both complicated disease and disease requiring surgery. Results: A total of 358 patients were included in the analysis. The majority of our patients had inflammatory, noncomplicated disease (58.4%), perianal disease (55.7%), and documented colonic inflammation (86.8%). On multivariable analysis, both IgG ASCA and OmpC were associated with complicated disease (OR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.67-4.28; OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.41-3.53, respectively) and disease requiring surgery (OR, 2.51; 95% CI, 1.49-4.22; OR, 3.57; 95% CI, 2.12-6.00). NE admixture to the African genome did not have any associations or interactions in relation to clinical outcome. Conclusions: Our study comprises the largest cohort of AAs with CD. The utility of serological markers for the prognosis of CD in NE applies equally to AA populations. Copyright 2017 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSupported by NIH/NIDDK R01 DK087694 (S.K.) and National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of National Institute of Health Award Number UL1TR000454 (M.B.).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ibd/izx021en_US
dc.language.isoen-USen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInflammatory Bowel Diseases
dc.subjectAfrican Americansen_US
dc.subjectCrohn's diseaseen_US
dc.subjectinflammatory bowel diseaseen_US
dc.subjectserologyen_US
dc.titleIBD Serology and Disease Outcomes in African Americans with Crohn's Diseaseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ibd/izx021
dc.identifier.pmid29272484


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