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dc.contributor.authorBai, L.
dc.contributor.authorNiu, X.
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Z.
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-21T18:46:27Z
dc.date.available2019-06-21T18:46:27Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85055091750&doi=10.1177%2f1744806918783457&partnerID=40&md5=84f0084d13f4733fbbc255a68ca16df0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9702
dc.description.abstractAcupuncture at pericardium 6 (PC6) shows a consistently positive efficacy in nausea response suggested by consensus expert guidelines. Nausea encompasses aversive symptom as well as strong emotional components. Disgust is a subjective emotion of uneasy commonly accompanying with a physiological response that is accompanied by strong visceral sensations (e.g., nausea). Understanding the brain circuitry by which acupuncture influences the disgust emotion may further elucidate the modulation effect of acupuncture on aversive experience. In the present study, a well-established aversive conditioning model on healthy subjects was combined with acupuncture intervention at PC6, as well as different acupoints (both local PC7 and distant GB37) as separate controls, to investigate the brain network involved aversive regulation with acupuncture; 48 healthy subjects were enrolled and randomized into four parallel groups: group 1 received disgust-induced (DI) stimuli only; groups 2, 3, and 4 received acupuncture at three single acupoints separately prior to the DI. Disgust sensations were rated at baseline and following disgust stimuli. Acupuncture PC6 can induce significant attenuations in disgust sensations than that of no intervention and acupuncture at other acupoints. Neuroimaging further showed that increased causal interaction strength between the cerebellum (nodulus) and insula can predict greater attenuations in aversive experiences. We also found evidence for radical reorganizations of local stronger casual interaction patterns to disgust-induced brain responses targeted by acupuncture at different acupoints. This study provided the brain substrate for acupuncture on aversion modulation. The coupling between the cerebellum (nodulus) and insula supported interoception system and vestibular control which provided the specific neural basis. Copyright The Author(s) 2018.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 81571752, 81771914, 81473667, and 81072773), National key research and development plan of China (2016YFC0100300), Shaanxi Nova Program (2014KJXX-34), and Science and Technology Planning Project of Guangdong Province (2016A020215202).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1744806918783457en_US
dc.language.isoen-USen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publications Inc.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofMolecular Pain
dc.subjectAcupunctureen_US
dc.subjectantiemetic effecten_US
dc.subjectcasual interactionen_US
dc.subjectdisgust regulationen_US
dc.subjectinsula-cerebellumen_US
dc.subjectinteroception systemen_US
dc.subjectvestibular controlen_US
dc.titleThe role of insula-cerebellum connection underlying aversive regulation with acupunctureen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1744806918783457
dc.identifier.pmid29921161


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