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dc.contributor.authorProctor, Lita M.
dc.contributor.authorCreasy, Heather H.
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Owen
dc.contributor.authorHuttenhower, Curtis
dc.contributor.authorThe Integrative HMP (iHMP) Research Network Consortium
dc.creatorProctor, L.
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-12T14:18:48Z
dc.date.available2019-06-12T14:18:48Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-30
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85066471013&origin=inward
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9504
dc.descriptionFunding for microbiome science, human and otherwise, is now being coordinated among NIH Centers and Institutes (https://www.niaid. nih.gov/research/trans-nih-microbiome-working-group); other US government agencies including the National Science Foundation, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Agriculture, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and Department of Defense (https://commonfund.nih.gov/hmp/programhighlights); philanthropic organizations including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the March of Dimes, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the Sloan Foundation, the Keck Foundation, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation, and others; and industry and public– private partnerships.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe NIH Human Microbiome Project (HMP) has been carried out over ten years and two phases to provide resources, methods, and discoveries that link interactions between humans and their microbiomes to health-related outcomes. The recently completed second phase, the Integrative Human Microbiome Project, comprised studies of dynamic changes in the microbiome and host under three conditions: pregnancy and preterm birth; inflammatory bowel diseases; and stressors that affect individuals with prediabetes. The associated research begins to elucidate mechanisms of host–microbiome interactions under these conditions, provides unique data resources (at the HMP Data Coordination Center), and represents a paradigm for future multi-omic studies of the human microbiome. © 2019, The Author(s).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding from NIH grants UH2/UH3AI083263 and U54HD080784 (G.A.B., J.F.S., K. Jefferson) supported with funds from the Common Fund, the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, and the Office of Research on Women’s Health, grant U54DK102557 (C.H., R. Xavier), including funds from the Common Fund, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, and the Office of Dietary Supplements and grant U54DK102556 (M.P.S., G.M.W.), with funds from the Common Fund and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-019-1238-8en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNatureen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectIntegrative Human Microbiome Projecten_US
dc.subjectNIH Human Microbiome Projecten_US
dc.subject.meshMicrobiotaen_US
dc.titleThe Integrative Human Microbiome Projecten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41586-019-1238-8
dc.relation.volume569


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Attribution 3.0 United States
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