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dc.contributor.authorLiu, T.
dc.contributor.authorIvaturi, V.
dc.contributor.authorSabato, P.
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-05T18:28:20Z
dc.date.available2019-06-05T18:28:20Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85049774121&doi=10.1111%2fcts.12555&partnerID=40&md5=5db7559c7d802929811c681a1ea2a197
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9472
dc.description.abstractSorafenib administered at the approved dose continuously is not tolerated long‐term in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The purpose of this study was to optimize the dosing regimen by characterizing the sorafenib exposure‐response relationship in patients with AML. A one‐compartment model with a transit absorption compartment and enterohepatic recirculation described the exposure. The relationship between sorafenib exposure and target modulation of kinase targets (FMS‐like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3)‐ITD and extracellular signal‐regulated kinase (ERK)) were described by an inhibitory maximum effect (Emax) model. Sorafenib could inhibit FLT3‐ITD activity by 100% with an IC50 of 69.3 ng/mL and ERK activity by 84% with an IC50 of 85.7 ng/mL (both adjusted for metabolite potency). Different dosing regimens utilizing 200 or 400 mg at varying frequencies were simulated based on the exposure‐response relationship. Simulations demonstrate that a 200 mg twice daily (b.i.d.) dosing regimen showed similar FLT3‐ITD and ERK inhibitory activity compared with 400 mg b.i.d. and is recommended in further clinical trials in patients with AML. Copyright 2018 The Authors. Clinical and Translational Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeuticsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSource of Funding. The project described was supported in part by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cooperative Agreement U01CA070095, and UM1CA186691 (B.D.S., K.W.P., and M.A.R.) and by the Analytical Pharmacology Core of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins (National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants P30CA006973 and UL1TR001079). Grant number UL1TR 001079 is from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) a component of the NIH, and NIH Roadmap for Medical Research. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the Johns Hopkins ICTR, NCATS, or NIH.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cts.12555en_US
dc.language.isoen-USen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltden_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical and Translational Science
dc.subjectFLT3en_US
dc.subject.meshfms-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3en_US
dc.subject.meshLeukemia, Myeloid, Acute--drug therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshSorafeniben_US
dc.titleSorafenib Dose Recommendation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Based on Exposure-FLT3 Relationshipen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cts.12555
dc.identifier.pmid29702736


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