• Simulation to Improve Confidence among Newly Licensed Nurses in the Pediatric Intensive Care Setting

      Hamilton, Hannah; Franquiz, Renee (2020-05)
      Introduction: Communication and critical thinking are essential practice competencies for every registered nurse. However, newly licensed registered nurses (NLRN) often lack these skills on entry into practice contributing to low levels of clinical confidence. Aims: The purpose of this Quality Improvement (QI) project was to implement and evaluate the effectiveness of simulation on clinical confidence among NLRNs. Methods: This QI project was guided by the MAP-IT model and involves NLRNs in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit within an urban academic teaching hospital. NLRNs participated in three clinical simulations reflecting common PICU clinical practice, utilizing the Simulation Module for Assessment of Resident’s Targeted Event Responses (SMARTER) and the Behavior Assessment Tool (BAT). NLRN confidence data were collected immediately pre-simulation and post-simulation, as well as one-month post-simulation using the self-report C-Scale Instrument of Clinical Confidence. Qualitative data was collected via observation by the NLRN preceptor using the C-Scale Instrument of Clinical Confidence. Paired sample t-tests were used to determine a significant change in confidence, and content analysis was performed by two evaluators on the qualitative data derived from the C-Scale observations to identify confidence themes and patterns. Results: Paired sample t-tests revealed a significant increase in clinical confidence between baseline and sustained one-month post simulation. Qualitative data collection of preceptor observations revealed improved clinical confidence and communication abilities. Conclusions and Implications: Data indicates that simulation is an effective strategy to increase clinical confidence as perceived by the NLRNs. Incorporation of simulation into transition-to-practice programs such as Nurse Residency or facility orientation is an evidence-based recommendation to improve development of clinical confidence and communication abilities in this population.
    • Simulation to Improve Confidence and Competence of the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner

      Williams, Julie E.; McComiskey, Carmel A. (2019-05)
      Background: Neonatal nurse practitioners must maintain competence in low-volume, high-risk procedures to provide timely, high-quality, and safe care. In institutions with multiple providers e.g. fellows, residents, and neonatal nurse practitioners, the number of procedures available per provider may be very low. Simulation education provides an opportunity to practice procedures without compromising the care of patients or competition. Local Problem: The project institution is an academic center with a high level of procedural competition due to the presence of physicians, physician trainees, and nurse practitioners. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to implement and evaluate the impact of a needle thoracentesis simulation on the confidence and competence of neonatal nurse practitioners. Interventions: A simulation was implemented for 15 full-time neonatal nurse practitioners in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. A pre-simulation survey to assess each neonatal nurse practitioner’s perception of procedural confidence and competence was conducted. Subsequently, each neonatal nurse practitioner received PowerPoint slides with an embedded video on the correct performance of a needle thoracentesis. Following the pre-survey and PowerPoint slides, each neonatal nurse practitioner participated in the needle thoracentesis simulation. Utilizing a procedural checklist adapted from the National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Competency and Orientation Toolkit for Neonatal Nurse Practitioners, the nurse practitioners needle chest thoracentesis skills were assessed. After completing the simulation, the nurse practitioners received an identical post-simulation survey to re-evaluate their perception of their procedural confidence and competence. Results: Neonatal nurse practitioners reported an increase in confidence in their 1) ability to determine when a needle thoracentesis was necessary versus allowing spontaneous resolution (p<0.01); 2) and in their ability to perform an emergency needle thoracentesis competently without or with minimal procedural guidance (p=0.04). They also reported an increase in confidence in their ability to troubleshoot unexpected problems that might occur during the procedure (p<0.01) and an increase in confidence in their ability to incorporate patient safety measures in the event of an emergency thoracentesis (p=0.03). Conclusions: This quality improvement project provided support for the use of simulation to increase the confidence and competence of the neonatal nurse practitioner in performing a chest needle thoracentesis and to assist neonatal nurse practitioners in maintaining competency in low volume high risk procedures.