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dc.contributor.authorObeng, A.O.
dc.contributor.authorFei, K.
dc.contributor.authorLevy, K.D.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-21T18:56:25Z
dc.date.available2019-05-21T18:56:25Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85054713893&doi=10.3390%2fjpm8030024&partnerID=40&md5=14c2b9f4478bdb52e8dd2c480713fa36
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9295
dc.description.abstractGenetic medicine is one of the key components of personalized medicine, but adoption in clinical practice is still limited. To understand potential barriers and provider attitudes, we surveyed 285 physicians from five Implementing GeNomics In pracTicE (IGNITE) sites about their perceptions as to the clinical utility of genetic data as well as their preparedness to integrate it into practice. These responses were also analyzed in comparison to the type of study occurring at the physicians' institution (pharmacogenetics versus disease genetics). The majority believed that genetic testing is clinically useful; however, only a third believed that they had obtained adequate training to care for genetically "high-risk" patients. Physicians involved in pharmacogenetics initiatives were more favorable towards genetic testing applications; they found it to be clinically useful and felt more prepared and confident in their abilities to adopt it into their practice in comparison to those participating in disease genetics initiatives. These results suggest that investigators should explore which attributes of clinical pharmacogenetics (such as the use of simplified genetics-guided recommendations) can be implemented to improve attitudes and preparedness to implement disease genetics in care. Most physicians felt unprepared to use genetic information in their practice; accordingly, major steps should be taken to develop effective clinical tools and training strategies for physicians. Copyright 2018 by the authorsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding: This study is supported by National Human Genome Research Institute or the National Institutes of Health (NHGRI) (5U01HG007278, U01HG006380, 5U01HG007762, U01HG007775, U01HG007269 and U01HG07253) and National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) (UL1TR000067). AOO is also supported by National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) 3U01HG008701-02S1 (eMERGE-PGx).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jpm8030024en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMDPI AGen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Personalized Medicine
dc.subjectBarriersen_US
dc.subjectChronic diseaseen_US
dc.subjectClinical implementationen_US
dc.subjectClinical utilityen_US
dc.subjectGenetic medicineen_US
dc.subjectGenetic testingen_US
dc.subjectPharmacogeneticsen_US
dc.subjectPhysician attitudesen_US
dc.subjectPhysician educationen_US
dc.titlePhysician-reported benefits and barriers to clinical implementation of genomic medicine: A multi-site ignite-network surveyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/jpm8030024


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