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dc.contributor.authorDugas, M.
dc.contributor.authorCrowley, K.
dc.contributor.authorGao, G.G.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-21T18:56:22Z
dc.date.available2019-05-21T18:56:22Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85043377102&doi=10.1371%2fjournal.pone.0192807&partnerID=40&md5=b8df94acf610d2877e5e643b7357d297
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9254
dc.description.abstractmHealth tools to help people manage chronic illnesses have surged in popularity, but evidence of their effectiveness remains mixed. The aim of this study was to address a gap in the mHealth and health psychology literatures by investigating how individual differences in psychological traits are associated with mHealth effectiveness. Drawing from regulatory mode theory, we tested the role of locomotion and assessment in explaining why mHealth tools are effective for some but not everyone. A 13-week pilot study investigated the effectiveness of an mHealth app in improving health behaviors among older veterans (n = 27) with poorly controlled Type 2 diabetes. We developed a gamified mHealth tool (DiaSocial) aimed at encouraging tracking of glucose control, exercise, nutrition, and medication adherence. Important individual differences in longitudinal trends of adherence, operationalized as points earned for healthy behavior, over the course of the 13-week study period were found. Specifically, low locomotion was associated with unchanging levels of adherence during the course of the study. In contrast, high locomotion was associated with generally stronger adherence although it exhibited a quadratic longitudinal trend. In addition, high assessment was associated with a marginal, positive trend in adherence over time while low assessment was associated with a marginal, negative trend. Next, we examined the relationship between greater adherence and improved clinical outcomes, finding that greater adherence was associated with greater reductions in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. Findings from the pilot study suggest that mHealth technologies can help older adults improve their diabetes management, but a "one size fits all" approach may yield suboptimal outcomes. Copyright 2018 Dugas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0192807en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONE
dc.subjectDiaSocialen_US
dc.subjectmhealth toolsen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2en_US
dc.subject.meshMobile Applicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Complianceen_US
dc.subject.meshVeteransen_US
dc.titleIndividual differences in regulatory mode moderate the effectiveness of a pilot mHealth trial for diabetes management among older veteransen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0192807
dc.identifier.pmid29513683


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