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dc.contributor.authorPassos, V.F.
dc.contributor.authorMelo, M.A.S.
dc.contributor.authorLima, J.P.M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-21T18:56:21Z
dc.date.available2019-05-21T18:56:21Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85049235481&doi=10.1590%2f1807-3107bor-2018.vol32.0040&partnerID=40&md5=9bd073acac3205fbd275910d07c1cd1e
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9239
dc.description.abstractThis research explored the potential of Camellia sinensis-derived teas and active compounds to be used as treatments to prevent dentin wear. Human root dentin slabs were randomly assigned to 5 groups (n = 10) as follows: distilled water (DW, control), epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), theaflavin gallate derivatives (TF), commercial green tea (GT), and commercial black tea (BT). The samples were submitted to a pellicle formation and an erosive cycling model (5x/day, demineralization using 0.01 M hydrochloric acid/60 s) followed by remineralization (human stimulated saliva/60 min) for three days. The samples were treated for 5 min using the test group solutions between the erosive cycles. Dentin changes were assessed with profilometry analysis and FT-Raman spectroscopy. The data regarding wear were analyzed by ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (p < 0.05). EGCG, TF derivatives, and both regular teas significantly suppressed erosive dentin loss (38-47%, p < 0.05). No obvious changes in the Raman spectra were detected in the specimens; however, the DW group had a minor relationship of 2880/2940 cm-1. The phenolic contents in both green and black tea and the important catechins appear to have protective effects on dentin loss.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1807-3107bor-2018.vol32.0040en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBrazilian oral research
dc.subject.meshCamellia sinensisen_US
dc.subject.meshDentinen_US
dc.subject.meshMatrix Metalloproteinasesen_US
dc.subject.meshTooth Erosionen_US
dc.titleActive compounds and derivatives of camellia sinensis responding to erosive attacks on dentinen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1590/1807-3107bor-2018.vol32.0040
dc.identifier.pmid29846385


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