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dc.contributor.authorPauza, C.D.
dc.contributor.authorLiou, M.-L.
dc.contributor.authorLahusen, T.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-21T18:56:21Z
dc.date.available2019-05-21T18:56:21Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85048296411&doi=10.3389%2ffimmu.2018.01305&partnerID=40&md5=7edec0c88c6eb98376dc5a4b8ed9f93f
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9233
dc.description.abstractHuman gamma delta T cells have extraordinary properties including the capacity for tumor cell killing. The major gamma delta T cell subset in human beings is designated Vγ9Vδ2 and is activated by intermediates of isoprenoid biosynthesis or aminobisphosphonate inhibitors of farnesyldiphosphate synthase. Activated cells are potent for killing a broad range of tumor cells and demonstrated the capacity for tumor reduction in murine xenotransplant tumor models. Translating these findings to the clinic produced promising initial results but greater potency is needed. Here, we review the literature on gamma delta T cells in cancer therapy with emphasis on the Vγ9Vδ2 T cell subset. Our goal was to examine obstacles preventing effective Vγ9Vδ2 T cell therapy and strategies for overcoming them. We focus on the potential for local activation of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells within the tumor environment to increase potency and achieve objective responses during cancer therapy. The gamma delta T cells and especially the Vγ9Vδ2 T cell subset, have the potential to overcome many problems in cancer therapy especially for tumors with no known treatment, lacking tumor-specific antigens for targeting by antibodies and CAR-T, or unresponsive to immune checkpoint inhibitors. Translation of amazing work from many laboratories studying gamma delta T cells is needed to fulfill the promise of effective and safe cancer immunotherapy. Copyright 2018 Pauza, Liou, Lahusen, Xiao, Lapidus, Cairo and Li.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAmerican Gene Technologies International, Inc. (AGT) is a privately held corporation. RL was funded by a grant from AGT to test gamma delta T cell immunotherapy for cancer in murine models and is supported by the Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center award from the National Cancer Institute (P30 CA134274, Kevin Cullen, MD Principal Investigator). CC is funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease for research on pediatric gamma delta T cells (R01 AI104702, Cristiana Cairo, PhD Principal Investigator and U01 HD092308, Cristiana Cairo, PhD Principal Investigator).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2018.01305en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.A.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Immunology
dc.subjectCanceren_US
dc.subjectGamma deltaen_US
dc.subjectImmuno-oncologyen_US
dc.subjectT cellen_US
dc.subjectTargeted immunotherapyen_US
dc.subjectVdelta2 gamma delta T cellsen_US
dc.titleGamma delta T cell therapy for cancer: It is good to be localen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fimmu.2018.01305


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