Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFeldstein Ewing, S.W.
dc.contributor.authorChang, L.
dc.contributor.authorCottler, L.B.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-17T13:21:13Z
dc.date.available2019-05-17T13:21:13Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85033783837&doi=10.1016%2fj.dcn.2017.11.004&partnerID=40&md5=4e9ec906760e91ac09e3adec8acdf125
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9150
dc.description.abstractRetention efforts are critical to maintain relationships with research participants over time. This is especially important for the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, where families are asked to stay engaged with the study throughout the course of 10 years. This high-degree of involvement is essential to longitudinally track child and adolescent development. At a minimum, we will connect with families every 6 months by telephone, and every year in person, with closer contact with the youth directly as they transition into adolescence. Differential retention, when related to non-random issues pertaining to demographic or risk features, can negatively impact the generalizability of study outcomes. Thus, to ensure high rates of retention for all participants, the ABCD study employs a number of efforts to support youth and families. This overview details the framework and concrete steps for retention. Copyright 2017en_US
dc.description.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2017.11.004en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ltden_US
dc.relation.ispartofDevelopmental Cognitive Neuroscience
dc.subjectABCD studyen_US
dc.subjectAdolescentsen_US
dc.subjectLongitudinalen_US
dc.subjectMulti-siteen_US
dc.subjectRetentionen_US
dc.titleApproaching Retention within the ABCD Studyen_US
dc.typeReviewen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.dcn.2017.11.004
dc.identifier.pmid29150307


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record