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dc.contributor.authorD'Adamo, C.R.
dc.contributor.authorNovick, J.S.
dc.contributor.authorFeinberg, T.M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-17T12:53:04Z
dc.date.available2019-05-17T12:53:04Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85043707706&doi=10.1080%2f07315724.2018.1427158&partnerID=40&md5=2148a697f83187f8a53568878c500a97
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9079
dc.description.abstractObjective: Iron deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency in the world. While deficiency can often be resolved through dietary supplementation with iron, adverse events are common and frequently preclude compliance. The objective of this study was to determine whether a food-derived dietary supplement containing a low dose of iron and nutrients that increase iron absorption could resolve iron deficiency with fewer adverse events than reported at higher doses. Methods: A pilot clinical trial (NCT02683369) was conducted among premenopausal women with nonanemic iron deficiency that was verified by blood screening. Participants consumed a dietary supplement (Blood Builder®/Iron Response®) once daily for 8 weeks containing 26 mg of iron, vitamin C, folate, and other food-derived nutrients. Primary outcomes were markers of iron status (serum ferritin, hemoglobin, soluble transferrin receptor, total body iron stores) and secondary outcomes were self-reported fatigue and energy. All outcomes were assessed at baseline and 8 weeks. Adverse events were monitored with questionnaires, daily diaries, and contact with a physician. Dependent samples t test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to analyze outcomes. Results: Twenty-three participants enrolled in the study. Iron deficiency was resolved in the sample (mean serum ferritin: baseline = 13.9 μg/L, 8 weeks = 21.1 μg/L, p < 0.001). All other markers of iron status, fatigue, and energy also improved during the study (p < 0.04). No adverse events were reported. Conclusions: While larger and controlled studies are needed to confirm these findings, a food-derived dietary supplement with a low dose of iron and absorption-enhancing nutrients resolved iron deficiency and improved all other markers of iron status without any adverse events. Copyright 2018 Christopher R. D'Adamo, James S. Novick, Termeh M. Feinberg, Valerie J. Dawson, and Larry E. Miller Copyright 2018, Copyright Christopher R. D'Adamo, James S. Novick, Termeh M. Feinberg, Valerie J. Dawson, and Larry E. Miller.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSupport for this research was provided by FoodState, Inc. and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases grant number T35 DK095737.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07315724.2018.1427158en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American College of Nutrition
dc.subjectdietary supplementen_US
dc.subjectferritinen_US
dc.subjectfolateen_US
dc.subjecthemoglobinen_US
dc.subjectIronen_US
dc.subjectnonanemic iron deficiencyen_US
dc.subjectsoluble transferrin receptoren_US
dc.subjecttotal body iron storesen_US
dc.subjectvitamin Cen_US
dc.titleA Food-Derived Dietary Supplement Containing a Low Dose of Iron Improved Markers of Iron Status Among Nonanemic Iron-Deficient Womenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/07315724.2018.1427158


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