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dc.contributor.authorHughes, Driscoll, C.A.
dc.contributor.authorDavis, N.L.
dc.contributor.authorMiles, M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-17T12:53:00Z
dc.date.available2019-05-17T12:53:00Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85045575228&doi=10.4187%2frespcare.05619&partnerID=40&md5=f1a7c6acdd3dce2c859fd7498c1ffc0a
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9031
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) reduces extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) use in term and near-term neonates with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn; however, its overutilization is increasing. We hypothesized that implementing a shared baseline protocol would safely improve evidence-based INO use in a Level IV neonatal ICU.METHODS: Through several plan-do-study-act cycles, a shared baseline protocol for initiation and weaning of INO was developed and implemented starting in August 2014. Based on user feedback, the shared baseline protocol was amended and re-evaluated at regular intervals. Significant changes for process and outcome measures related to utilization of INO were detected using statistical process control, bivariate analyses using t test or nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test as appropriate, and chi-square and Fisher exact testing as appropriate. Comparisons between the pre-plan-do-study-act group (January 2012 to July 2014) and post-plan-do-study-act group (August 2014 to October 2015) were made.RESULTS: One hundred sixteen INO courses in 95 subjects were administered during the pre-plan-do-study-act period, and 44 episodes were initiated in 39 subjects during the post-plan-do-study-act period. Process control charts demonstrate significant reductions in the percentage of INO doses > 20 ppm and the percentage of prolonged (>4-d) INO courses. Prolonged INO courses decreased from 67.9 to 40% (P = .032), whereas the median duration of INO per course decreased from 8 to 4 d (P < .001). The percentage of INO courses that exceeded the dose of 20 ppm decreased from 18.1 to 2.3% (P = .009). Very delayed INO weaning (weaning at FIO2 ≤ 0.40) decreased from 41.9 to 21.2% (P = .038). There were no differences in the percentage of INO courses administered to non-sedated subjects or the percentage of INO courses administered to preterm infants. There was no difference for death or ECMO between groups.CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of a shared baseline protocol to encourage appropriate INO initiation and weaning safely decreased INO exposures. Focused efforts on reducing unapproved INO use in preterm infants are warranted. Copyright 2018 by Daedalus Enterprises.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.4187/respcare.05619en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Association for Respiratory Careen_US
dc.relation.ispartofRespiratory care
dc.subjectevidence-based health careen_US
dc.subjectinfanten_US
dc.subjectinhaled nitric oxideen_US
dc.subjectnewbornen_US
dc.subjectprematureen_US
dc.subjectpulmonary hypertensionen_US
dc.subjectquality improvementen_US
dc.titleA Quality Improvement Project to Improve Evidence-Based Inhaled Nitric Oxide Useen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4187/respcare.05619
dc.identifier.pmid28974647


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