Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAdams, C.A.
dc.contributor.authorStein, D.M.
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, J.J.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-17T12:52:59Z
dc.date.available2019-05-17T12:52:59Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85061260679&doi=10.1136%2ftsaco-2017-000142&partnerID=40&md5=28659ecd811ed4a96ca4d4758a5d71b7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9025
dc.description.abstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death after traumatic injury. Raised intracranial pressure (ICP) is particularly associated with poor TBI outcomes, prompting clinicians to monitor this parameter, using it to guide therapies aimed at reducing pressures. Despite this approach being recommended by several bodies such as the Brain Trauma Foundation and the American College of Surgeons, the evidence demonstrating that ICP-guided therapy improves outcome is limited. The topic was debated at the 36th Annual Point/Counterpoint Acute Care Surgery Conference and the following article summarizes the discussants points of view along with a summary of the evidence.Level of Evidence Level III. Copyright Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1136/tsaco-2017-000142en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTrauma Surgery and Acute Care Open
dc.subjectBrain Injuriesen_US
dc.subjectIntracranial Pressureen_US
dc.subjectneurocritical careen_US
dc.titleDoes intracranial pressure management hurt more than it helps in traumatic brain injury?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/tsaco-2017-000142


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record