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dc.contributor.authorHall, E.C.
dc.contributor.authorTyrrell, R.
dc.contributor.authorScalea, T.M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-17T12:52:59Z
dc.date.available2019-05-17T12:52:59Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85046545032&doi=10.1136%2ftsaco-2017-000149&partnerID=40&md5=9d6dfbcb80324f01bce2f4c1956e5522
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/9023
dc.description.abstractbackground Unplanned hospital readmissions increase healthcare costs and patient morbidity. We hypothesized that a program designed to reduce trauma readmissions would be effective. Methods A Trauma Transitional Care Coordination (TTCC) program was created to support patients at high risk for readmission. TTCC interventions included call to patient (or caregiver) within 72 hours of discharge to identify barriers to care, complete medication reconciliation, coordination of appointments, and individualized problem solving. Information on all 30-day readmissions was collected. 30-day readmission rates were compared with center-specific readmission rates and population-based, risk-adjusted rates of readmission using published benchmarks. results 260 patients were enrolled in the TTCC program from January 2014 to September 2015. 30.8% (n=80) of enrollees were uninsured, 41.9% (n=109) reported current substance abuse, and 26.9% (n=70) had a current psychiatric diagnosis. 74.2% (n=193) attended outpatient trauma appointments within 14 days of discharge. 96.3% were successfully followed. Only 6.6% (n=16) of patients were readmitted in the first 30 days after discharge. This was significantly lower than both center-specific readmission rates before start of the program (6.6% vs. 11.3%, P=0.02) and recently published population-based trauma readmission rates (6.6% vs. 27%, P<0.001). Discussion A nursing-led TTCC program successfully followed patients and was associated with a significant decrease in 30-day readmission rates for patients with high-risk trauma. Targeted outpatient support for these most vulnerable patients can lead to better utilization of outpatient resources, increased patient satisfaction, and more consistent attainment of preinjury level of functioning or better. Level of evidence Level IV. Copyright Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1136/tsaco-2017-000149en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTrauma Surgery and Acute Care Open
dc.subjectPatient Readmissionen_US
dc.subjectHospitalsen_US
dc.subjectindex admissionen_US
dc.titleTrauma Transitional Care Coordination: Protecting the most vulnerable trauma patients from hospital readmissionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/tsaco-2017-000149


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