• Effects of water-aging for 6 months on the durability of a novel antimicrobial and protein-repellent dental bonding agent

      Zhang, N.; Zhang, K.; Weir, M.D. (SpringerNature, 2018)
      Biofilms at the tooth-restoration bonded interface can produce acids and cause recurrent caries. Recurrent caries is a primary reason for restoration failures. The objectives of this study were to synthesize a novel bioactive dental bonding agent containing dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM) and 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) to inhibit biofilm formation at the tooth-restoration margin and to investigate the effects of water-aging for 6 months on the dentin bond strength and protein-repellent and antibacterial durability. A protein-repellent agent (MPC) and antibacterial agent (DMAHDM) were added to a Scotchbond multi-purpose (SBMP) primer and adhesive. Specimens were stored in water at 37 °C for 1, 30, 90, or 180 days (d). At the end of each time period, the dentin bond strength and protein-repellent and antibacterial properties were evaluated. Protein attachment onto resin specimens was measured by the micro-bicinchoninic acid approach. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to test the biofilm response. The SBMP + MPC + DMAHDM group showed no decline in dentin bond strength after water-aging for 6 months, which was significantly higher than that of the control (P<0.05). The SBMP + MPC + DMAHDM group had protein adhesion that was only 1/20 of that of the SBMP control (P<0.05). Incorporation of MPC and DMAHDM into SBMP provided a synergistic effect on biofilm reduction. The antibacterial effect and resistance to protein adsorption exhibited no decrease from 1 to 180 d (P>0.1). In conclusion, a bonding agent with MPC and DMAHDM achieved a durable dentin bond strength and long-term resistance to proteins and oral bacteria. The novel dental bonding agent is promising for applications in preventive and restorative dentistry to reduce biofilm formation at the tooth-restoration margin.