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dc.contributor.authorCorona, C.C.
dc.contributor.authorZhang, M.
dc.contributor.authorWadhawan, A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-29T14:47:36Z
dc.date.available2019-03-29T14:47:36Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85062457002&doi=10.1515%2fpteridines-2019-0001&partnerID=40&md5=7ec39c47aff3434027953f8e76c31af7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/8689
dc.description.abstractBackground: Evidence links Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), a neurotropic parasite, with schizophrenia, mood disorders and suicidal behavior, all of which are associated and exacerbated by disrupted sleep. Moreover, low-grade immune activation and dopaminergic overstimulation, which are consequences of T. gondii infection, could alter sleep patterns and duration. Methods: Sleep data on 833 Amish participants [mean age (SD) = 44.28 (16.99) years; 59.06% women] were obtained via self-reported questionnaires that assessed sleep problems, duration and timing. T. gondii IgG was measured with ELISA. Data were analyzed using multivariable logistic regressions and linear mixed models, with adjustment for age, sex and family structure. Results: T. gondii seropositives reported less sleep problems (p < 0.005) and less daytime problems due to poor sleep (p < 0.005). Higher T. gondii titers were associated with longer sleep duration (p < 0.05), earlier bedtime (p < 0.005) and earlier mid-sleep time (p < 0.05). Conclusions: It seems unlikely that sleep mediates the previously reported associations between T. gondii and mental illness. Future longitudinal studies with objective measures are necessary to replicate our findings. Copyright 2019 Celine C. Corona, et al.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAcknowledgments: We would like to thank the University of Maryland, Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (U.S. FDA) for their support through their cooperative agreement FDU.001418 (PI, Postolache). We also acknowledge our gratitude to the participants for their time and willingness to participate in the study. We thank the entire staff of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Amish Research Clinic, Lancaster, PA, USA. Additional support was received from the Mid-Atlantic Nutrition Obesity Research Center (NORC) Pilot & Feasibility Project (Postolache, PI), a sub-award of the parent grant P30DK072488 (Simeon I. Taylor, Program Director) and the Merit Award 1 I01 CX001310-01 from CSR&D/Veterans Affairs Administration (PI, Postolache). The results and interpretations provided represent opinions of the authors and not necessarily the official positions of the Department of Defense, United States Air Force, VA, NIH or US-FDA.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1515/pteridines-2019-0001en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherDe Gruyteren_US
dc.relation.ispartofPteridines
dc.subjectIgGen_US
dc.subjectmid-sleep timeen_US
dc.subjectsleep durationen_US
dc.subjectsleep timingen_US
dc.subjectToxoplasma gondiien_US
dc.titleToxoplasma gondii IgG associations with sleepwake problems, sleep duration and timingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1515/pteridines-2019-0001


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