• Increasing safety and well-being of children: results of a selective prevention intervention

      DePanfilis, Diane; Dubowitz, Howard (2003-06-12)
      Presented at the Society for Prevention Research 11th Annual Meeting “Research to Policy”, Washington, DC, June 12th, 2003 – June 14th, 2003. The purpose of this study is "to explore the relationship between length of service and outcomes of a five year federally funded demonstration project to help families prevent neglect."
    • Increasing Social Support Through an Intensive Home Based Child Maltreatment Intervention Program

      Harrington, Donna; DePanfilis, Diane; Koverola, Catherine; Daining, Clara (2002-07-07)
      PowerPoint presentation at the International Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect, Denver, Colorado, July 7-10, 2002; Highlights research into early intervention techniques for reducing the risk of child neglect due to the risk factors of care-giver depression and low social support.
    • The Positive Parenting Program: Exploration of the Impact of PPP on Intermediate and Long‐term Outcomes

      Woodruff, Kristen (2009-10-02)
      This PowerPoint presentation is a summary of the results of the retrospective evaluation of the Positive Parenting Program. More details are available in the reports "Evaluating Outcomes for At‐risk Families Participating in The Family Tree’s Positive Parenting Program: A Retrospective Study - Interim Report (February 2009)" and "Evaluating Outcomes for At‐risk Families Participating in The Family Tree’s Positive Parenting Program: A Retrospective Study - Part II, Long Term Outcomes, Summary and Conclusions (August 2009)"
    • Quality Assurance Processes in Maryland Child Welfare. 3rd Annual Child Welfare Accountability Report

      DePanfilis, Diane; Esaki, Nina; Gregory, Gillian, M.S.W.; Hayward, R. Anna; Shaw, Terry V. (2009-12)
      Executive Summary: The goal of the projects encompassed in the Child Welfare Accountability Act is to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of child welfare services in Maryland. The Maryland Quality Assurance (QA) unit does this through the evaluation of quality assurance processes and system implementation processes in Maryland child welfare. Although Maryland has mechanisms in place to successfully achieve objectives of a comprehensive Quality Assurance system, it has yet to realize its full potential for identifying strengths and needs and providing a framework for meaningful program and systems improvement. Acknowledgements: This report was compiled by faculty and staff at the University of Maryland, School of Social Work's Ruth H. Young Center for Families & Children (RYC) in partnership with staff at the Department of Human Resources, Social Service Administration (DHR/SSA). Diane DePanfilis, Sarah Kaye, and Terry V. Shaw managed the interagency agreement for the Quality Assurance process. Gillian Gregory led the Local Supervisory Review process and Foster Parent Survey. Anna Hayward oversaw the Family Centered Practice evaluation component. Nina Esaki assisted with the preparation of this report. Carnitra White, Richard Larson, David Ayer and Linda Carter at DHR/SSA guided the activities related to the Quality Assurance process. The Quality Assurance unit at DHR/SSA includes Linda Carter, Shirley Brown, Josephine Lambert, Dee Ritterpusch, and Jewel Wilson. A separate companion report, "Maryland Child Welfare Performance Indicators: 3rd Annual Child Welfare Accountability Report," describes Maryland's performance on the outcome and performance measures outlined by the Child Welfare Accountability Act.
    • Quality Assurance Processes in Maryland Child Welfare. 4th Annual Child Welfare Accountability Report

      Ahn, Haksoon; Esaki, Nina; Gregory, Gillian, M.S.W.; Melz, Heidi; O'Connor, Julia, M.S.W.; Shaw, Terry V. (2010-12)
      Executive Summary: The Child Welfare Accountability Act of 2006 (Maryland Family Law, Section 1301-1311 inclusive) specified the development and implemntation of a proces to measure the efficiency and effectiveness of child welfare services in Maryland that addresses the safety, permanency and well-being of children in the care and custody [of] the Maryland Department of Human Resources/the Local Departments of Social Services. The Quality Assurance Process in Maryland Child Welfare does this through the evaluation of quality assurance and system implementation processes in Maryland's child welfare system. The state of Maryland made great strides in 2010 towards achieving the development of an integrated, comprehensive Quality Assurance system. Acknowledgements: This report was compiled by faculty and staff at the University of Maryland, School of Social Work's Ruth H. Young Center for Families & Children (RYC) in partnership with staff at the Department of Human Resources, Social Service Administration (DHR/SSA). Terry V. Shaw, Nina Esaki, Haksoon Ahn, and Diane DePanfilis co-managed the interagency agreement for the Quality Assurance process. Gillian Gregory and Julia O'Connor led the Local Supervisory Review process and Foster Parent Survey. Heidi Melz oversaw the Family Centered Practice evaluation component. Carnitra White, Richard Larson, David Ayer and Linda Carter at DHR/SSA guided the activities related to the Quality Assurance process. The Quality Assurance unit at DHR/SSA includes Linda Carter, Josephine Lambert, and Jewel Wilson-Crawford. A separate companion report, "Maryland Child Welfare performance Indicators: 4th Annual Child Welfare Accountability Report," describes Maryland's performance on the outcome and performance measures outlined by the Child Welfare Accountability Act.
    • Quality Assurance Processes in Maryland Child Welfare. 5th Annual Child Welfare Accountability Report

      Ahn, Haksoon; O'Connor, Julia, M.S.W.; Reiman, Sarah; Shaw, Terry V. (2011-12)
      Executive Summary: The Child Welfare Accountability Act of 2006 (Maryland Family Law, Section 1301-1311 inclusive) specified the development and implementation of a process to measure the efficiency and effectiveness of child welfare services in Maryland that addresses the safety, permanency and well-being of children in the care and custody of the state. The Quality Assurance Process in Maryland Child Welfare process does this through the evaluation of quality assurance, quality improvement and system implementation processes in Maryland's child welfare system. The state of Maryland continues to improve their ability to effectively monitor and improve services and service delivery throughout the state and has moved closer to the development of an integrated, comprehensive Quality Assurance system. Acknowledgement: This report was compiled by faculty and staff at the University of Maryland, School of Social Work's Ruth H. Young Center for Families & Children (RYC) in partnership with staff at the Department of Human Resources, Social Service Administration (DHR/SSA). A separate companion report, "Maryland Child Welfare Performance Indicators: 5th Annual Child Welfare Accountability Report," describes Maryland's performance on the outcome and performance measures outlined by the Child Welfare Accountability Act.
    • Screening for neglect prevention: Can the community identify families at risk for neglect?

      Ernst, Joy Swanson; DePanfilis, Diane; Dubowitz, Howard; Ting, Laura (2001-06-20)
      PowerPoint presentation at the 9th Annual American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children (APSAC), Washington, DC, June 20-23, 2001. Highlights screening criteria and identification of needs for families at possible risk of neglect.
    • Strengthening multi-ethnic families and communities: A promising group model to enhance prevention.

      Glazer-Semmel, Esta M.; Sullivan, Kathleen, L.G.S.W. (2002-04-25)
      The University of Maryland, Baltimore - Center for Families, Family Connections Program evaluated the process and outcomes of implementing the Strengthening Multi-Ethnic Families and Communities: A Violence Prevention Parent Training Program (SMEFC) with families at risk of child neglect. Families resided in the West Baltimore Empowerment Zone that is comprised of distressed neighborhoods filled with high levels of crime, violence, and substance abuse...
    • Strengths-based practice: a community speaks

      Glazer-Semmel, Esta M.; National Colloquium of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children (APSAC) (2003-06)
      The University of Maryland, Baltimore - Center for Families, Family Connections Program evaluated the process and outcomes of implementing the Strengthening Multi-Ethnic Families and Communities: A Violence Prevention Parent Training Program (SMEFC) with families at risk of child neglect. Families resided in the West Baltimore Empowerment Zone that is comprised of distressed neighborhoods filled with high levels of crime, violence, and substance abuse. In addition to the opportunity to participate in the SMEFC program, families received home-based intervention consisting of emergency assistance, individualized home-based counseling services, and service facilitation/coordination. The intervention was designed to help families increase child safety and well-being and prevent child neglect within their families. It was hypothesized that this combination of services individualized to each family’s specific strengths and needs, would reduce risk factors and increase protective factors, ultimately leading to the achievement of two outcomes: child safety and child well-being. (from Project abstract)
    • Structured decision making and risk assessment: assessing neglect

      DePanfilis, Diane (1998-11-16)
      PowerPoint presentation at the 12th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect, Cincinnati, November 16-21, 1998. Highlights child neglect risk issues and assessment techniques.
    • Too little...too late!

      DePanfilis, Diane (2002-04-22)
    • Using prevention science to design, implement, and evaluate prevention strategies: lessons from Family Connections

      DePanfilis, Diane; Strieder, Frederick H. (2009-03)
      Presentation at the 17th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect entitiled, Focusing on the Future: Strengthening Families and Communities, Atlanta, March 30–April 4, 2009. Highlights the process of designing and implementing preventive interventions for child neglect in families at risk.
    • Using prevention science to enhance the safety and well-being of children

      DePanfilis, Diane (2004-10-13)
      Report on the use of prevention science principles to design and evaluate a community based program focused on preventing child neglect. (from Objectives)
    • Working with families to reduce the risk of neglect: Results from two demonstration projects

      DePanfilis, Diane; Dubowitz, Howard; Kelley, Susan, Ph.D. (2001-04-23)
      PowerPoint presentation at the 13th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect (theme title: Faces of change: Embracing diverse cultures and alternative approaches), Albuquerque, NM, April 23-28, 2001. Highlights the services provided by 2 programs, Family Connections in Baltimore, MD, and Project Healthy Grandparents, in Fulton and DeKalb Counties, Georgia. Discusses caregiver and child risk factors, intervention philosophy and services, research methods, and targeted outcomes.
    • Working with intergenerational families to increase safety, well-being, and permanency

      Girvin, Heather; Strieder, Frederick H.; DePanfilis, Diane (2004-04-29)
      PowerPoint presentation at the 11th Annual Governor's Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect, Baltimore, April 29, 2004. Highlights risk factors and intervention strategies associated with child neglect in intergenerational families.
    • Workshop 30: Applying Logic Models in Plans for Systemic Change and Evaluation

      DePanfilis, Diane; White, Carolyn, M.S.W. (2009-05-29)