• Back to the Future: Measuring the Effects of Community Based Practice

      DePanfilis, Diane; Ernst, Joy Swanson; Glazer-Semmel, Esta M. (1999-12-01)
      PowerPoint presentation at the National Association for Family-Based Services 13th Annual Empowering Families Conference in Baltimore, Dec. 1-4, 1999. Highlights research from Family Connections, a community based program providing early intervention techniques to prevent child neglect in families at risk.
    • Calculating Caseload and Staffing Needs: In-home Services Redesign in Maryland

      DePanfilis, Diane; Kaye, Sarah; Shaw, Terry V.; Mols, Cathy; Coppage, Susan (2008-12-03)
      PowerPoint presentation at the American Humane Time and Effort: Perspectives on Workload Roundtable, Santa Fe, New Mexico, December 3-5, 2008. Highlights efforts to determine staffing needs for the Maryland Place Matters Initiative. Assessments of safety and risk categories are combined with levels of service which are used to calculate caseloads. Includes formulas.
    • Child Neglect: Promising Strategies for Early Intervention

      DePanfilis, Diane; Glazer-Semmel, Esta M. (2002-05-29)
      PowerPoint presentation at the 10th Annual APSAC Colloquium, New Orleans, Louisiana, May 29-June 1, 2002; Overview of the Family Connections program promoting early intervention with families at risk for neglect.
    • Child welfare accountability: evaluating quality assurance processes in Maryland.

      Kaye, Sarah; DePanfilis, Diane (2007-12)
      Executive Summary: The Child Welfare Accountability Act of 2006 increased legislative oversight of the Maryland Quality Assurance processes in child welfare. The Act also provides a framework for the Department of Human Resources (DHR) to partner with the University of Maryland School of Social Work (UMB/SSW) to develop the Maryland Quality Assurance (QA) Collaborative. The purpose of the Collaborative is to evaluate quality assurance processes and make recommendations for improvement. As required by 5-1309(B), this annual report presents 1) an evaluation of existing quality assurance policies and practices and 2) recommendations on how to improve quality assurance processes in child welfare. A separate companion report, "Child Welfare Accountability: Annual Report on Maryland Performance Indicators," describes Maryland's performance on performance indicators outlined by the Child Welfare Accountability Act. This report was compiled by faculty and staff at the University of Maryland School of Social Work's Ruth H. Young Center for Families & Children in partnership with staff at the Department of Human Resources, Social Service Administration. Drs. Diane DePanfilis and Sarah Kaye Faraldi managed the Child Welfare Accountability project and writing of this report. Anna Hayward and Gillian Gregory participated in the design and implementation of the Quality Assurance process evaluation and led the redesign of the supervisory review instrument. Cathy Mol, Carnitra White, and David Ayer guided the activities of the Quality Assurance Collaborative. The Quality Assurance team of the Social Services Administration includes Gloria Valentine, Shirley Brown, Jospehine Lambert, Dee Ritterpusch, Elizabeth Mitchell Stemley, and Jewel Wilson.
    • Educating Practitioners to Work with Families in Tomorrow’s World

      Glazer-Semmel, Esta M.; DePanfilis, Diane; Tyler, Lucille (1999-12-01)
      PowerPoint presentation at the National Association for Family-Based Services 13th Annual Empowering Families Conference, Baltimore, Dec. 1-4, 1999. Highlights the content and process of training staff associated with the Family Connections community based program.
    • The Effects of Housing on Childcare Adequacy: An Exploratory Analysis

      Ernst, Joy Swanson; Meyer, Megan; DePanfilis, Diane (2003-01-19)
      PowerPoint presentation at the 7th Annual Society for Social Work Research Conference, Washington, DC, January 19, 2003. Investigates the relationship between poor housing conditions and child neglect.
    • Evaluating Outcomes for At-risk Families Participating in The Family Tree’s Positive Parenting Program: A Retrospective Study - Interim Report

      Woodruff, Kristen (2009-02)
      The first phase of the retrospective evaluation of outcomes for families participating in the Positive Parenting Program utilized existing administrative data collected by The Family Tree (TFT) during the course of business. This study examines five protective factors (parenting knowledge and attitudes) and one risk factor (low self esteem) to determine whether change occurred after the PPP intervention, and to identify any group differences by the child’s placement status. Exploratory analysis was also conducted to identify group differences by referral source. (From Executive Summary)
    • Evaluating Outcomes for At-risk Families Participating in The Family Tree’s Positive Parenting Program: A Retrospective Study - Part II: Long Term Outcomes, Summary and Conclusions

      Woodruff, Kristen (2009-08)
      The Family Tree is Maryland’s largest private non-profit agency dedicated to strengthening families to prevent child abuse and neglect. As part of this effort, The Family Tree provides a group-based parenting skills training program targeting high-risk families, many who had an indicated report of child maltreatment. The evaluation utilized administrative data to 1) describe the characteristics of the high-risk families who participated in the group-based parent skills training program (PPP) in Baltimore City over a six year period (2002 to 2007); 2) evaluate the intermediate outcomes for families completing the program, including parenting knowledge and attitudes and self esteem; and 3) evaluate the longer-term outcomes including child safety, stability, and permanency for families who participated in the program, comparing those who completed the program with those who started but did not complete the program. The Final Report, or Part II of this evaluation presents the Long Term Outcomes, Summary and Conclusions. Results are also described in an Interim Report, and a summary PowerPoint presentation: The Positive Parenting Program - Exploration of the Impact of PPP on Intermediate and Long‐term Outcomes.
    • Evaluating the Implementation of Family Centered Practice in Maryland: July 1, 2009 - June 30, 2010

      DePanfilis, Diane; Hayward, R. Anna; Melz, Heidi (2010-06)
      Maryland’s Family Centered Practice (FCP) model of child welfare is based on a set of core values and practice strategies that focus on increasing positive outcomes for children served by public child welfare to ensure their safety, well-being, and permanence. As per agreement between DHR-SSA and the UMB-SSW, researchers at the Ruth H. Young Center for Families and Children are evaluating the implementation of FCP across Maryland.
    • Evaluating the Implementation of Family Centered Practice in Maryland: July 1, 2010-June 30, 2011

      Ahn, Haksoon; Reiman, Sarah; O'Connor, Julia, M.S.W.; Michalopoulos, Lynn Theresa Murphy; Naeem, Shaikh; Shaw, Terry V. (2011)
      Per agreement between the Department of Human Resources, Social Service Administration (DHR/SSA) and the University of Maryland School of Social Work, researchers at the Ruth H. Young Center for Families and Children are evaluating the implementation of FCP [Family Centered Practice] across Maryland. The evaluation of Maryland's FCP initiative is informed by administrative data collected as part of regular agency practice, focus groups with staff and families, and a survey of local department staff. This report represents data from a follow-up staff survey and focus groups during the implementation phases of FCP, July 1 2010-June 30, 2011. Acknowledgements: This report was prepared by faculty and staff at the University of Maryland, School of Social Work's Ruth H. Young Center for Families & Children in partnership with staff at the Maryland Department of Human Resources, Social Service Administration (DHR/SSA). Terry V. Shaw and Haksoon Ahn co-managed the interagency agreement that supports the development of this report. Julia O'Connor and Sarah Reiman oversaw the Family Centered Practice evaluation components. Lynn Michalopolos led the qualitative analysis from the focus group data. Naeem Shaikh led the quantitative analysis from the follow-up survey data. Jessica Moore assisted with transcription for the qualitative analysis. Karen Powell and Tiffany Hancock at DHR/SSA guided the activities related to the Family Centered Practice evaluation process.
    • Family Connections

      Strieder, Frederick H.; Clarkson Freeman, Pamela A.; Talbot, Nancy G. (University of Maryland, Baltimore. School of Social Work, 2018-05-10)
    • Family Connections, Interview coordinator's manual: specifications for facilitating research interviews.

      DePanfilis, Diane; Ernst, Joy Swanson (1999-10)
      Interview coordinator's manual from the Family Connections program providing documentation for research protocols. Covers three types of interviews: Before intervention, at the close of intervention, and six months after the date of case closure.
    • Family Connections: preventing child neglect

      DePanfilis, Diane (2004-06-29)
      The purpose of this presentation is "To describe and report on the results of a community based prevention program that was designed to respond to the epidemiology of child maltreatment recurrences in Baltimore."
    • Helping Families Connect to Meet Their Children’s Needs

      Glazer-Semmel, Esta M.; DePanfilis, Diane; Farr, Michelle (1999-12-01)
      PowerPoint presentatoin at the National Association for Family-Based Services 13th Annual Empowering Families Conference, Baltimore, Dec. 1-4, 1999. Highlights the goals of the Family Connections community based program. Includes guiding principles, screening criteria, child neglect risk, caregiver risk, intervention strategies and outcomes.
    • Helping Families Connect to Meet Their Children’s Needs Today and Tomorrow

      DePanfilis, Diane; Glazer-Semmel, Esta M.; Camp, Winette (2000-02-28)
      PowerPoint presentation at the Black Administrators in Child Welfare Annual Conference, Washington, DC, February 28-29, 2000 (theme title: Successful Outcomes for African American Children and Families in the New Millenium: A Renewed Commitment); Highlights the Family Connections program in Baltimore, Maryland, a collaborative effort of the University of Maryland School of Social Work, the Baltimore City Department of Social Services, and other community agencies.
    • Helping Families Prevent Neglect: Final Report

      DePanfilis, Diane (2002-09-30)
      The Helping Families Prevent Child Neglect Project was a 5-year demonstration project implemented through collaboration between the University of Maryland School of Social Work, and University of Maryland School of Medicine, Pediatrics. The Helping Families Prevent Child Neglect Project offered home-based intervention to families at risk of neglect in order to test two premises: (1) treatment needs to be long-term and (2) parent groups enable needed connections and enhance parenting competency...
    • Identifying intervention strategies and meeting reasonable effort requirements

      DePanfilis, Diane (2001-07-31)
      PowerPoint presentation at the national symposium entitled, "Child Neglect: Promising Approaches to Achieve Safety, Permanency, and Well-Being" (Baltimore, MD; July 31-Aug. 2, 2001). Highlights principles for working with families to reduce risk of neglect including assisting with basic needs, community outreach, family assessment/tailored intervention, and cultural considerations.
    • Improving the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Child Welfare Services Through State, Stakeholder, and University Collaboration

      Mols, Cathy; Ayer, David; DePanfilis, Diane; Shaw, Terry V.; Kaye, Sarah (2008-10-20)
      PowerPoint presentation at the Child Welfare Leadership in Action Conference, Washington, DC, Oct. 20, 2008, sponsored by the Administration for Children & Families, Children's Bureau. Highlights the Maryland Place Matters Initiative the primary goals for which are to keep at-risk children with their families in the community and to reduce the need for out-of-home care. Emphasis is on family-centered practice and is a collaborative effort between the University of Maryland, School of Social Work and the Maryland Department of Human Resources, Social Services Administration.
    • Increasing protective factors and decreasing risk factors to achieve safety and well-being outcomes among families at risk for neglect

      DePanfilis, Diane; Dubowitz, Howard (2003-02-02)
      Presented at the 17th Annual San Diego Conference on Child and Family Maltreatment February 2-7, 2003. The purpose of this study is "to explore the relationship between length of service and outcomes of a five year federally funded demonstration project to help families prevent neglect."