• Back to the Future: Measuring the Effects of Community Based Practice

      DePanfilis, Diane; Ernst, Joy Swanson; Glazer-Semmel, Esta M. (1999-12-01)
      PowerPoint presentation at the National Association for Family-Based Services 13th Annual Empowering Families Conference in Baltimore, Dec. 1-4, 1999. Highlights research from Family Connections, a community based program providing early intervention techniques to prevent child neglect in families at risk.
    • Child Neglect: Promising Strategies for Early Intervention

      DePanfilis, Diane; Glazer-Semmel, Esta M. (2002-05-29)
      PowerPoint presentation at the 10th Annual APSAC Colloquium, New Orleans, Louisiana, May 29-June 1, 2002; Overview of the Family Connections program promoting early intervention with families at risk for neglect.
    • Educating Practitioners to Work with Families in Tomorrow’s World

      Glazer-Semmel, Esta M.; DePanfilis, Diane; Tyler, Lucille (1999-12-01)
      PowerPoint presentation at the National Association for Family-Based Services 13th Annual Empowering Families Conference, Baltimore, Dec. 1-4, 1999. Highlights the content and process of training staff associated with the Family Connections community based program.
    • Helping Families Connect to Meet Their Children’s Needs

      Glazer-Semmel, Esta M.; DePanfilis, Diane; Farr, Michelle (1999-12-01)
      PowerPoint presentatoin at the National Association for Family-Based Services 13th Annual Empowering Families Conference, Baltimore, Dec. 1-4, 1999. Highlights the goals of the Family Connections community based program. Includes guiding principles, screening criteria, child neglect risk, caregiver risk, intervention strategies and outcomes.
    • Helping Families Connect to Meet Their Children’s Needs Today and Tomorrow

      DePanfilis, Diane; Glazer-Semmel, Esta M.; Camp, Winette (2000-02-28)
      PowerPoint presentation at the Black Administrators in Child Welfare Annual Conference, Washington, DC, February 28-29, 2000 (theme title: Successful Outcomes for African American Children and Families in the New Millenium: A Renewed Commitment); Highlights the Family Connections program in Baltimore, Maryland, a collaborative effort of the University of Maryland School of Social Work, the Baltimore City Department of Social Services, and other community agencies.
    • Strengthening multi-ethnic families and communities: A promising group model to enhance prevention.

      Glazer-Semmel, Esta M.; Sullivan, Kathleen, L.G.S.W. (2002-04-25)
      The University of Maryland, Baltimore - Center for Families, Family Connections Program evaluated the process and outcomes of implementing the Strengthening Multi-Ethnic Families and Communities: A Violence Prevention Parent Training Program (SMEFC) with families at risk of child neglect. Families resided in the West Baltimore Empowerment Zone that is comprised of distressed neighborhoods filled with high levels of crime, violence, and substance abuse...
    • Strengths-based practice: a community speaks

      Glazer-Semmel, Esta M.; National Colloquium of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children (APSAC) (2003-06)
      The University of Maryland, Baltimore - Center for Families, Family Connections Program evaluated the process and outcomes of implementing the Strengthening Multi-Ethnic Families and Communities: A Violence Prevention Parent Training Program (SMEFC) with families at risk of child neglect. Families resided in the West Baltimore Empowerment Zone that is comprised of distressed neighborhoods filled with high levels of crime, violence, and substance abuse. In addition to the opportunity to participate in the SMEFC program, families received home-based intervention consisting of emergency assistance, individualized home-based counseling services, and service facilitation/coordination. The intervention was designed to help families increase child safety and well-being and prevent child neglect within their families. It was hypothesized that this combination of services individualized to each family’s specific strengths and needs, would reduce risk factors and increase protective factors, ultimately leading to the achievement of two outcomes: child safety and child well-being. (from Project abstract)