• Aftercare Study: Outcomes of Independent Living Final Report

      DePanfilis, Diane; Daining, Clara; University of Maryland, Baltimore. School of Social Work; BCDSS Social Services Administrators Meeting (2003-09-30)
      The Outcomes of Independent Living project was a collaborative research project between the University of Maryland Center for Families, the Family Welfare Research and Training Group, and the Baltimore City Department of Social Services. The purpose of this project was to provide information on the outcomes of young adults who left out-of-home care in Baltimore City. Choice of outcomes was guided by the federal legislation in collaboration with Baltimore City Department of Social Service staff. The outcomes of interest included educational achievement, employment status, homelessness, parenthood, life skills, health risk behavior and criminal activity. Explanatory domains examined included social support, spirituality, and stress. (from Project abstract)
    • Assessment of outcomes of independent living final report

      DePanfilis, Diane; Daining, Clara (2003-06-25)
      The Outcomes of Independent Living project was a collaborative research project between the University of Maryland Center for Families, the Family Welfare Research and Training Group, and the Baltimore City Department of Social Services. The purpose of this project was to provide information on the outcomes of young adults who left out-of-home care in Baltimore City. Choice of outcomes was guided by the federal legislation in collaboration with Baltimore City Department of Social Service staff. The outcomes of interest included educational achievement, employment status, homelessness, parenthood, life skills, health risk behavior and criminal activity. Explanatory domains examined included social support, spirituality, and stress. (from Project abstract)
    • Designing and implementing computer-assisted interviews

      DePanfilis, Diane; Daining, Clara; Park, Eunice, L.G.S.W.; Haynes, Kimberly (2002-04-12)
      PowerPoint presentation at the 5th National Child Welfare Data Conference, National Resource Center for Information Technology in Child Welfare. (Conference title: Making it Work: Using Data for Program Improvement.) Highlights the advantages and challenges of using computer-assisted interviews (CAI). Discusses questionnaire development and includes examples.
    • Estimating the Costs Associated with Caring for Foster Children in United States

      O'Neale, Shalita; DePanfilis, Diane; Daining, Clara; Frick, Kevin (2008-12-11)
      This study, a collaboration between the University of Maryland School of Social Work, Children’s Rights, and the National Foster Parent Association implemented methods to estimate costs associated with reimbursing foster parents for adequately meeting the basic needs of foster children in their care. The Adoption Assistance and Child Welfare Act of 1980 provides federal funding for foster care to the states if they meet certain requirements under a plan that must first be approved by the Secretary of the US Department of Health and Human Services. Among the state plan requirements that states must meet is that foster parents be provided foster care maintenance payments which the law defines as: “payments to cover the cost of (and the cost of providing) food, clothing, shelter, daily supervision, school supplies, a child’s personal incidentals, liability insurance with respect to a child, and reasonable travel to the child’s home for visitation.” Consumer Expenditure Survey data were used to develop templates for estimating costs to meet basic needs in each of these categories considering differential costs based on child’s age and geographic location. The proposed “Minimum Adequate Rates for Children” (MARC) developed for each state and the District of Columbia based on cost of living adjustments. The proposed MARC for each jurisdiction may be used as a resource for adjusting base rates that meet the actual estimated costs of meeting the basic needs of children in foster care. (From project summary)
    • Factors influencing retention of child welfare staff: a systematic review of research: a report from the Institute for the Advancement of Social Work Research conducted in collaboration with University of Maryland School of Social Work Center for Families & Institute for Human Services Policy

      Zlotnik, Joan Levy; DePanfilis, Diane; Daining, Clara; McDermott Lane, Melissa; Institute for the Advancement of Social Work Research (IASWR); Univerisity of Maryland, Baltimore. School of Social Work. Center for Families & Institute for Human Services Policy (2005-06)
      A systematic review of research and outcomes studies related to recruitment and retention in child welfare. Although there have been numerous literature reviews that report that there are organizational and personal factors that affect recruitment and retention, there has been no systematic review of research studies to more fully examine “what works” in regard to recruitment and retention in child welfare and to illuminate the specific methodology and definitions used to frame those studies. It is hoped that by synthesizing the results across studies, practitioners, researchers, educators, policy makers, and administrators in the child welfare field may use lessons learned to take steps to increase the retention of a competent child welfare workforce. (from Executive Summary)
    • Hitting the M.A.R.C. : establishing foster care Minimum Adequate Rates for Children, technical report

      Daining, Clara; Frick, Kevin; Farber, Julie; Levinthal, Lisa (2007-10)
      This report presents the first‐ever calculation of the real expenses of caring for a child in foster care in the United States. It systematically demonstrates that rates of support for children in foster care are far below what is needed to provide basic care for these children in nearly every state in the nation. On average, across the U.S., current foster care rates must be raised by 36 percent in order to reach the Foster Care Minimum Adequate Rates for Children (the “Foster Care MARC”) calculated through this project. In some states, rates are less than half of what it actually costs to care for a child in foster care. (from Executive Summary)
    • Hitting the M.A.R.C.: establishing foster care Minimum Adequate Rates for Children [brief report]

      DePanfilis, Diane; Daining, Clara; Frick, Kevin; Farber, Julie; Levinthal, Lisa (2007-10)
      "This report provides a brief description of how the Foster Care MARC was calculated. A more detailed description is provided in the technical report..." The Technical Report is also available in this Digital Archive at http://hdl.handle.net/10713/262.
    • Increasing Social Support Through an Intensive Home Based Child Maltreatment Intervention Program

      Harrington, Donna; DePanfilis, Diane; Koverola, Catherine; Daining, Clara (2002-07-07)
      PowerPoint presentation at the International Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect, Denver, Colorado, July 7-10, 2002; Highlights research into early intervention techniques for reducing the risk of child neglect due to the risk factors of care-giver depression and low social support.
    • Making it Work: Using Data for Program Improvement

      DePanfilis, Diane; Daining, Clara; Park, Eunice, L.G.S.W.; Haynes, Kimberly (2002-04-12)
    • Professional Education for Child Welfare Practice: Improving Retention In Public Child Welfare Agencies

      Zlotnik, Joan Levy; DePanfilis, Diane; Daining, Clara; McDermott Lane, Melissa (2005-07)
      A recent systematic review of research and outcome studies was undertaken by the Institute for the Advancement of Social Work Research (IASWR) in collaboration with the University of Maryland School of Social Work to answer the question: What conditions (personal and organizational factors) and strategies influence the retention of staff in public child welfare agencies? Of the 154 studies and reports found, 25 research studies specifically focused on child welfare populations and examined retention as the dependent variable. Of those research reports, seven focused on a specific strategy – Title IV-E Education for Child Welfare Practice — in examining retention outcomes. This Brief provides information about the Title IV-E Education for Child Welfare Practice program and examines the findings of those seven studies. This can both inform the field about the outcomes of Title IV-E supported educational opportunities as well as effective retention strategies.
    • Retaining Competent Child Welfare Workers: Lessons From Research

      Zlotnik, Joan Levy; DePanfilis, Diane; Daining, Clara; McDermott Lane, Melissa (2005-07)
      To determine effective retention strategies that child welfare agencies can implement, the Institute for the Advancement of Social Work Research (IASWR) in collaboration with the University of Maryland School of Social Work’s Center for Families and Institute for Human Services Policy, and with support from the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Human Services Workforce Initiative, undertook a systematic review of research and outcome studies to answer the question: What conditions and strategies influence the retention of staff in public child welfare? Conditions include both personal and organizational factors, and strategies are actions taken by some entity that are targeted to retain staff. A synthesis of results across studies can provide lessons learned that can be used by practitioners, researchers, educators, policy makers, and administrators to take steps to increase the retention of a competent child welfare workforce.
    • Therapeutic Visiting Pilot Project Annual Report 2001-2002

      Daining, Clara; Wechsler, Joe; DePanfilis, Diane (2002)
    • Understanding Retention In Child Welfare: Suggestions For Further Research And Evaluation

      Zlotnik, Joan Levy; DePanfilis, Diane; Daining, Clara; McDermott Lane, Melissa (2005-07)
      A recent systematic review of research on retention in child welfare, undertaken by the Institute for the Advancement of Social Work Research (IASWR) in collaboration with the University of Maryland School of Social Work, identified 25 studies over the past three decades that specifically address the conditions and factors that influence retention and the strategies that have been implemented to increase retention. However, analysis of the differences across these studies and the limitations of the available research lead to recommendations for future studies. The focus of this Brief is to discuss these research design issues and to make recommendations to the field about methods to enhance the scope and quality of research efforts to address retention issues.