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dc.contributor.authorCohee, Lauren M.
dc.contributor.authorChilombe, Moses
dc.contributor.authorNgwira, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorJemu, Samuel K.
dc.contributor.authorMathanga, Don P.
dc.contributor.authorLaufer, Miriam K.
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-25T16:43:07Z
dc.date.available2018-01-25T16:43:07Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/7412
dc.descriptionOnline ahead of print version of an article published in volume 98, no. 1 (Jan. 2018) issue of the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen_US
dc.description.abstractMalaria and neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), including schistosomiasis and soil transmitted helminths, threaten the health of school aged in sub-Saharan Africa. Established school-based mass drug administration (MDA) programs are used to control NTDs. Recent clinical trials have shown benefit of mass treatment of malaria in schools. The potential of adding malaria treatment to existing NTD programs has not been thoroughly evaluated. We offered malaria treatment with artemether-lumefantrine during routine NTD MDA and developed peer education programs in two primary schools in southern Malawi. We assessed participation, safety, and tolerability of coadministration of artemether-lumefantrine with praziquantel and albendazole. Results were compared with two schools conducting standard NTD MDA with additional monitoring by study staff. A total of 3,387 students (68%) received the standard NTD MDA. Among parents who came to schools on the day of the MDA, malaria treatment was well accepted; 87% of students who received the standard NTD MDA in intervention schools also consented for treatment with artemether-lumefantrine. The most frequent treatment emergent adverse events (AEs) were headache and vomiting. However, AEs were rare and were not more frequent in students who received artemether-lumefantrine in addition to praziquantel and albendazole. In this study, we found that the addition of malaria treatment to NTD MDA is well-received and safe. Such integrated programs may leverage existing infrastructures to reduce intervention costs and could become the framework for further integrated school-based health programs.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Grand Challenge Explorations grant (OPP1129097). Additional support for L. M. C. was provided by the National Institutes of Health National Research Service Award training grants (grant number T32AI05724).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectneglected tropical diseases (NTD)en_US
dc.subjectschool-age childrenen_US
dc.subject.meshMalaria--prevention & controlen_US
dc.subject.meshMalawien_US
dc.subject.meshMass Drug Administrationen_US
dc.subject.meshSchool Health Servicesen_US
dc.titleCombining Malaria and NTD Mass Treatment in Schools Pilot Study of the Addition of Mass Treatment for Malaria to Existing School-Based Programs to Treat Neglected Tropical Diseasesen_US
dc.title.alternativeCombining Malaria and NTD Mass Treatment in Schoolsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.17-0590
dc.identifier.ispublishedNoen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-19T18:30:05Z


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