Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFeldman, Steven G.
dc.contributor.authorKim, Jeffrey J.
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-10T16:34:19Z
dc.date.available2016-11-10T16:34:19Z
dc.date.issued2016-03-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/5977
dc.descriptionAward winning poster presented at the 2016 University of Maryland Baltimore Graduate Research Conference March 23, 2016, Baltimore, MD.en_US
dc.descriptionIncluded also is an earlier version of this poster presented at the 2015 University of Maryland Baltimore Graduate Research Conference.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Currently, there is no consensus of how to best maintain dental implants. With over 2 million dental implants placed annually, there is an urgent need for objective ways to measure plaque removal from peri-implant surfaces. Here, we developed a cost effective, fast and accurate way to measure the effectiveness of various oral hygiene products to maintain health of the implant and surrounding oral tissues using a 3D printer. Methods: Digitizations of dentoform teeth and jaws provided the basis for 3D-printed custom models. Simulated gingiva and genuine dental implants were incorporated to maximize clinical relevance. Fabricated model teeth were analyzed for consistency of cusp heights, inter-cusp distance and mass. Mass was remeasured following water immersion. An artificial plaque substrate (APS) was applied to 3D-printed and porcelain surfaces to ensure consistent performance. A standard by which toothbrush mediated APS removal from the interproximal and subgingival areas was developed, with varying brushing angle, force and toothbrush design. Results: The 3D-printed models had higher dimensional accuracy than the resolution of the 3D printer (X/Y<400μm, Z<100μm). Immersion in water yielded an increase in mass that was correlated linearly with time (r2 = .9365) and could be reversed upon desiccation. APS behaved similarly on the 3D-printed surface as porcelain. Conclusions: Lack of commercially available dentoforms with accurate dental implant anatomy limited the ability to simulate implant systems in vitro. However, the advent of low-priced commercial grade 3D printers enables individuals to create such models rapidly and at low cost. We developed highly accurate, anatomically correct, 3D-printed dental implant model systems, which mitigated flaws in extant designs and devised a high-throughput method for assessing in vitro plaque removal that is superior to existing methods. In the future, digital model files can be included in an electronic library for rapid manufacturing of identical models anywhere in the world.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectperi-implant surfacesen_US
dc.subjectplaque removalen_US
dc.subject3D printingen_US
dc.subject.lcshThree-dimensional printingen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implantsen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Plaqueen_US
dc.subject.meshOral Hygieneen_US
dc.titleDeveloping a 3D-Printed Peri-Implantium Based Plaque Assay (2016)en_US
dc.title.alternativeDeveloping 3D-Printed Peri-Implantium to Establish Periodontal Hygiene Efficacy (2015 version)en_US
dc.typePoster/Presentationen_US
dc.description.urinameFull Texten_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-19T18:12:14Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Feldman3DPoster2016.pdf
Size:
662.5Kb
Format:
PDF
Thumbnail
Name:
FeldmanIADRPoster2015.pdf
Size:
693.8Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/