The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, founded in 1841, is a thriving center for life sciences research and community service. Through its education, research, and service programs, the School of Pharmacy strives to improve the health and well-being of society by aiding in the discovery, development, and use of medicines.

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Recent Submissions

  • Determining the infectious potential of individuals with positive RT-PCR SARS-CoV-2 tests

    Doshi, Peter; Powers, John H (Oxford University Press, 2020-12-04)
  • Antibiotics Approved for Marketing in Populations Specifically Excluded From Premarketing Trials, 1999-2018

    Kuzucan, Aida; Powers, John H; Doshi, Peter
    Approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of a drug for a given indication is thought to reassure clinicians, other health care providers, and patients that substantial evidence of effectiveness exists for specific indicated populations (patients and diseases). This study examines whether FDA approval of certain antibiotics should be so reassuring for all patient populations identified in the FDA-approved labels. Specifically, this study compared patient populations covered by FDA-approved labels for 21 novel antibiotics approved between 1999 and 2018 to the patient exclusion and inclusion criteria of pivotal trials that supported those approvals. We found that every FDA-approved label for these antibiotics included at least one identifiable patient population that was explicitly excluded from enrolling in the supporting pivotal trials. Two antibiotics, bedaquiline and ceftazidime-avibactam, were approved for use in populations that were fully excluded from enrolling in registration trials.
  • Incompletely Reported Important Methodological Details and Inaccurate Description of the Formulation That the Control Arms Received in a Gardasil Vaccine Trial

    Bourgeois, Florence; Doshi, Peter; Hong, Kyungwan; Jefferson, Tom; Jones, Mark; Lee, Haeyoung; Rowhani-Farid, Anisa; Shamseer, Larissa; Spence, O'Mareen (American Society for Microbiology, 2020-11-04)
  • Covid-19 vaccine trial protocols released

    Doshi, Peter (BMJ Publishing Group, 2020-10-21)
  • Maryland Poison Center Annual Report 2019

    University of Maryland, Baltimore. Maryland Poison Center, 2019
  • Comparative effectiveness of pediatric and neonatal antimicrobial stewardship treatment algorithms in rapid diagnostic-detected bacteremia

    Kruger Howard, Amy; Claeys, Kimberly; Parbuoni, Kristine A.; Biggs, Jessica M.; Johnson, J. Kristie; Luneburg, Paige; Campbell, James D.; Morgan, Jill A. (2020-04)
  • Acceptance of medication - sweetness wins again

    Kruger Howard, Amy; Morgan, Jill A.; Selen, Arzu; Seung, Hyunuk; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Sayeed, Vilayat; Siddiqui, Akhtar; Hollenbeck, R. Gary; Hoag, Stephen W. (2019-09)
  • Impact of pharmacist patient education on asthma control

    Kruger Howard, Amy; Tsoukleris, Mona; Morgan, Jill A.; Seung, Hyunuk (2018-03)
  • Branching out: can satellite campus students lead the way?

    Rocafort, Patrick Tim; Morgan, Jill A.; Lebovitz, Lisa (2017-07)
  • For a satellite campus, is a residency a foul ball or home run?

    Rocafort, Patrick Tim; Morgan, Jill A.; Lebovitz, Lisa (2017-07)
  • Bivalirudin Use in Pediatric Patients

    Daniel, Shawnée N.; Parbuoni, Kristine A.; Kishk, Omayma A.; Morgan, Jill A.; Brown, Claudine; Walker, L. Kyle (2020-09-25)
  • Incidence of administration of QT-prolonging medications in pediatric patients

    Callaghan, Katelyn; Parbuoni, Kristine A.; Morgan, Jill A.
  • Covid-19: Do many people have pre-existing immunity?

    Doshi, Peter (BMJ Publishing Group, 2020-09-17)
  • Covid-19: Should doctors recommend treatments and vaccines when full data are not publicly available?

    Johnson, Raymond M.; Doshi, Peter; Healy, David, 1954- (BMJ, 24/08/2020)
  • Mapping Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) Questionnaire to EuroQoL-5D (EQ-5D) Utility Weights to Inform Economic Evaluations for Prostate Cancer

    Khairnar, Rahul; Palumbo, Francis Bernard, 1945- (2020)
    OBJECTIVES: To develop a mapping algorithm to obtain EuroQoL-5D-3L (EQ5D) health utilities from Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire. METHODS: This mapping study utilized baseline data from an international, multicenter, randomized controlled trial (NCT00331773) of patients with low-risk prostate cancer. Patient health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) data were collected using EPIC and health utilities were obtained using EQ5D. Data were divided into an estimation sample (n=765, 70%) and a validation sample (n=327, 30%). The relationship between the instruments was estimated using ordinary least squares (OLS), Tobit, and two-part models. Five-fold cross-validation (in-sample) was used to compare the predictive performance of the estimated models. Final models were selected based on root mean square error (RMSE). OLS models using baseline cross-sectional data, combined data from all assessment periods, and random effects (RE) models that explicitly model the longitudinal nature of the data were estimated to compare predictive ability of algorithms derived from cross-sectional and longitudinal data. Longitudinal predictive performance of OLS models derived using baseline data was examined in the post-intervention data. RESULTS: A total of 565 patients in the estimation sample had complete information on both EPIC and EQ5D questionnaires at baseline. Mean observed EQ5D utility was 0.90±0.13 (range: 0.28-1) with 55% of patients in full health. Low to moderate correlations were found between EQ5D utility and urinary (r=0.38), bowel (r=0.34) and hormonal (r=0.55) domains of EPIC; sexual domain was weakly correlated (r=0.18) with EQ5D utility. OLS models outperformed their counterpart models for all pre-determined model specifications. The best model fit was: “EQ5D utility = 0.248541 + 0.000748*(Urinary Function) + 0.001134*(Urinary Bother) + 0.000968*(Hormonal Function) + 0.004404*(Hormonal Bother) – 0.376487*(Zubrod) + 0.003562*(Urinary Function*Zubrod)”; RMSE was 0.10462. When comparing cross-sectional vs. longitudinal data, a mapping algorithm obtained using combined EPIC subdomain data outperformed other model types. Mean absolute differences (MDs) between reported and predicted were low in general and decreased as the time of assessment increased. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified mapping algorithms to generate EQ5D utilities from EPIC domain or sub-domain scores, with satisfactory longitudinal predictive performance. The study results will help estimate quality-adjusted life-years in future economic evaluations of prostate cancer treatments.
  • Early Symptom Improvement as a Predictor of Antidepressant Response in Children and Adolescents Diagnosed with Depression: Translating Evidence from Randomized Controlled Trials to Community Practice

    Spence, O'Mareen; dosReis, Susan (2020)
    Statement of the Problem: A common problem among children and adolescents diagnosed with depression who receive care in community settings is that antidepressant regimen changes such as psychotropic augmentation may occur soon after starting treatment. This raises the question as to whether such changes are implemented among youth who would otherwise respond to the antidepressant. Thus, the overarching objectives of this dissertation were to 1) distinguish early in treatment children and adolescents who are likely to respond, and 2) empirically evaluate the association between predicted response and psychotropic augmentation or switching in real world settings. Summary of Methods: Using randomized clinical trial (RCT) data, this research applied a Bayesian approach to predict the likelihood of initial (12 week) and sustained (18 week) response to treatment as a function of early changes in depressive symptoms (i.e. mood, somatic, subjective and behavioral) and other demographic and clinical factors. An innovative application of combined sample multiple imputations (CSMI) was used to estimate the 12-week predicted probability of response among commercially insured adolescents who received care in real-world settings. Each adolescent received a probability of treatment response, which was then used to compare the odds of psychotropic augmentation or switch. Results: Early changes in mood and somatic symptoms within the first six weeks of treatment are primary predictors of initial (at 12 weeks) and sustained (at 18 weeks) response to an antidepressant. Baseline depression severity is an important prognostic factor for initial response, and additional, though minimal improvement, in somatic symptoms from weeks 6 to 12 is indicative of sustained response. In a highly selected cohort of adolescents receiving care in community settings, an augmentation or switch occurred similarly among adolescents with a high versus low likelihood of responding to fluoxetine. Conclusion: The results suggest that other factors beyond expected antidepressant response (or lack thereof) might influence current treatment practices. Our findings have clinical and public health implications that support measurement-based care in pediatric depression. Our application of CSMI highlights several key areas of consideration for future pharmacoepidemiologic research aimed at translating RCT evidence to real world data to better understand clinical practices patterns.
  • A Model for Assessing Professional Association Engagement

    Gorman, Emily; Jackson, K. D.; Harrold, M.W.; Mercer, S.L.; Metcalf, M.; Lebovitz, Lisa; Tucker, Shannon R.; Block, K.F.; Franzini, R.; Coop, Andrew (2020)
    Assessing member engagement with a professional association is critical in determining the success of programs such as the AACP New Investigator Award (NIA), because engagement leads to organizational growth and is key to long term sustainability. A review of the literature indicated that many organizations are focused on increasing engagement, but there are few quantifications of engagement to be used to measures success of initiatives. Use of online communication tools such as AACP Connect can be quantified, and are often used as a proxy for engagement, but the literature is clear that the majority of individuals may be avid readers, but do not post. The authors searched peer-reviewed and organizational literature for published models evaluating organizational engagement to create a modified scale to quantify engagement following the NIA. The American Bar Association published an article assessing engagement of its members with five tiers, explaining the tiers as a continuum. Although presented by ABA as a continuum, this approach was seen by the authors as an approach to measure the depth of engagement.

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