• An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Extended-Release Naltrexone

      Hochheimer, Martin; Sacco, Paul; Unick, George Jay; 0000-0001-6644-4841 (2022)
      Medications for the treatment of opioid use disorder (MOUDs) are considered the gold standard form of treatment for this condition. There are two forms of MOUD treatment, agonist, and antagonist. Agonist treatment has the medical system provide people with opioid use disorder methadone or buprenorphine which are long lasting opioids that do not produce a euphoric reaction with the goal of alleviating cravings and mitigating illicit use of opioids. Conversely, antagonist treatment blocks opioid absorption in the brain. Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) is the most common antagonist treatment it is administered as a once-monthly injection. During the month after injection, patients who use opioids will not experience their effect and by negating the reward of opioid use the treatment discourages continued use. This study evaluated the effectiveness of buprenorphine and XR-NTX treatment on three characteristics: treatment retention, risk of opioid related acute care incidents, and changes in healthcare costs during treatment. Data from the Truven Health MarketScan® databases which records the date, type of interaction, and cost of every interaction that a person insured privately with one of over 250 insurance providers has with the healthcare system was used to identify a sample of approximately 30,000 people who were treated with buprenorphine or and 617 who were treated with XR-NTX for opioid use disorder. Treatment episodes were constructed based on filled prescription information and a frailty model survival analysis was fit both to a matched sample and the whole sample to length of treatment for each medication. The risk of acute care incidents was evaluated using a generalized estimating equation, and healthcare costs were evaluated using fixed-effects regression models. The study found that there are no significant differences in treatment retention between the MOUDS. Treatment with either medication was associated with an approximately 10% reduction, per day in treatment, of the odds of experiencing an acute care incident during one month. Healthcare costs increased while people were in treatment, with either MOUD, between approximately 0.85% and 1.5% for both opioid related and non-opioid related services.
    • Medications for Opioid Overdose, Withdrawal, & Addiction

      National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), 2022-01-14
      The National Institute on Drug Abuse supports research to develop new medicines and delivery systems to treat opioid use disorder and other substance use disorders as well as other complications of substance use (Including withdrawal and overdose), to help people choose treatments that are right for them.