• Attracting New EAP Users Through Online Text-Based Chat Services

      Veder, Barb; Torino, Stephanie; Beaudoin, Kelly; Zhao, Mark (Employee Assistance Society of North America, 2012-09)
      With individuals’ increasing comfort with technology, and demand to access services when and how they choose, many services including clinical ones are moving online. As individuals adapt to an ever-changing world, they expect their service providers to also keep pace with these changes. This report examines the impact of First Chat, a secure, synchronous, live counselling chat tool used to provide clients with immediate clinical support in an EAP setting. First Chat is a solution- focused, clinical consultation that helps a client address issues of immediate concern under the guidance of a trained clinical counsellor. Our staff collected data from a sample of 407 chats taken from the period of December 5, 2011 to January 31, 2012. We also measured the level of client satisfaction on post-chat surveys collected from 95 randomly-selected chats. In addition, client age and sex were then compared against normative utilization data from the suite of Shepell·fgi EAP support services for 2011.
    • EAP Outcomes, Critical Incident Effectiveness Measures and EAP Product Extension

      DeLapp, Gregory P.; Sharar, David A., 1961-; Attridge, Mark; Veder, Barb; Antonissen, Dirk (2018-10-12)
      KEYNOTE ADDRESS. During this moderated panel-session we will examine the value of our industry working towards a set of globally standardized workplace evaluation tools, including the Workplace Outcome Suite (WOS), the recently validated version of the WOS for workplace critical incident response - The Critical Incident Outcome Measure (CIOM), and a new organizational level measure of the effectiveness of EAP supports to workplace - the Short Inventory of Stress and Well-being tool from Europe. Additionally, this session will address the rationales for designing and incorporating these tools into your books of business.
    • EAP Works: Global Results from 24,363 Counseling Cases with Pre-Post Data on the Workplace Outcome Suite (WOS)

      Attridge, Mark; Sharar, David A., 1961-; DeLapp, Gregory P.; Veder, Barb (Institute for Health and Productivity Management, 2018-12)
      The Workplace Outcome Suite© (WOS) is a self-report instrument designed to evaluate the effectiveness of employee assistance program (EAP) counseling services from the perspective of the employee user of the service. More than 30 EAPs collected longitudinal data on all versions of the WOS from 2010 to 2018 and voluntarily submitted their raw data to Chestnut Global Partners for analysis. The 24,363 employees in this aggregated sample represent 26different countries, but most of the cases were from the United States (79%) and China (15%). The typical EAP case in this data set was a female, age 38, and was a self-referral into an external vendor of EAP services seeking help for a mental health concern. Outcomes were collected at the start of counseling and again approximately three months later. Evidence of the psychometric validity and test-retest reliability for all five WOS measures was found in correlational tests. Other tests of the change in outcomes from before to after use of EAP counseling found large effects on work presenteeism and life satisfaction (ηp2= .24 and .19), a medium-size effect on work absenteeism (ηp2= .13), and small effects on both workplace distress and work engagement (ηp2= .05 and .04). Although most EAP cases had no absence from work either before counseling or at follow-up (58% and 78%, respectively), the average amount per case per month of missed work due to the personal concern was reduced from 7.4 hours before to 3.9 hours after use of the EAP. Weak findings on moderator tests determined EAP counseling was effective to a similar degree on WOS outcomes across contextual factors of client age, sex, country, referral type, clinical concerns, industry of the employer, and delivery models for providing employee assistance counseling (i.e., external vendors, internal staff programs and hybrid models). As an alternative to the fill-in-the-blank response format requiring a specific number of hours, a modified version of the work absenteeism single item is offered that has a 5-point scale with normative levels of absence hours obtained from the Pre EAP use global data that define each of the 1-5 rating options. More details and related findings are presented in the Workplace Outcomes Suite 2018 Annual Report from Chestnut Global Partners.
    • EFAP Video Counselling: A Retrospective Comparison of Video and In-Person Clinical Cases

      Veder, Barb; Beaudoin, Kelly; Mani, Michele; Pope, Stan; Ritchie, Janice (Employee Assistance Society of North America, 2014-12)
      In May 2010, video counselling was added to the counselling services offered through the Employee and Family Assistance Program (EFAP) at Shepell as a pilot project with a full operational launch in September 2011. This retrospective study examined clinical outcomes of video and in-person counselling modalities. A sample of 68 video counselling (VC) cases and 68 in- person (IP) counselling cases were collected from a pool of client clinical files closed in 2012. The study compared the two counselling modalities on: (1) client demographic factors (age, gender), (2) session type (individual vs. conjoint sessions with couples or families), (3) type of presenting issue, (4) average total session hours, (5) client ratings of session helpfulness, (6) client reported goal completion, (7) client session no show rates, (8) client withdrawal rate, and (9) improvement in pre/post client self-assessments of mental health and health. Results indicated that the two modalities had largely similar clinical experience and outcome profiles. However, VC cases were also less likely to cancel their scheduled appointments and less likely to withdraw from counseling than IP cases. In addition, most of the VC cases (69%) lived within a half-hour drive to a local counselor’s office and yet chose to use the video conferencing option for the EFAP service. These findings offer evidence for the appeal and clinical effectiveness of technology-based counseling.
    • How to Calculate the ROI for EAP Counseling from Improvements in Work Outcomes: Part 2 of Series with Global Data from the Workplace Outcome Suite© by Morneau Shepell

      Attridge, Mark; Sharar, David A., 1961-; Veder, Barb; Steenstra, Ivan (Employee Assistance Society of North America, 2020)
      This is the second in a three-part series based on the larger Workplace Outcome Suite© (WOS) Annual Report for 2018.1 This popular self- report measurement tool was developed by Chestnut Global Partners in 2010 and is now owned by Morneau Shepell. It is a scientifically validated tool that is offered free to the employee assistance field. This paper presents a revised version of the chapter on the return on investment (ROI) from the 2018 WOS Annual Report. The aim is to provide a detailed example of how to calculate the business value for employee assistance programs (EAPs) based on employee users of counseling services. In this example, 24,363 cases with self-reported work absenteeism hours and work presenteeism ratings were used to estimate the ROI for EAPs. The combination of missed hours from work and lost productivity hours while at work were combined in a single metric of lost productive time (LPT). The improvement in productivity was compared to a no change estimate hypothetical condition which assumes that the same baseline level of deficit in LPT continued over a 3-month period of distress if untreated. This effect was adjusted down to remove the improvement likely to have been caused by naturally occurring influences other than use of EAP counseling (estimated at 23%). Changes in the outcomes revealed that almost five days of productive work time (39 hours) over the 3-month period were restored per case after the use of EAP counseling; worth an estimated $1,731 USD per EAP case. Most of the savings came from reduced work presenteeism rather than work absenteeism (79% vs. 21%, respectively). This outcome was then used in a model with industry averages for the level of annual utilization of EAP counseling (4.9% of all covered employees) and the total cost of the EAP program ($13 per employee per year). The result was an estimated ROI for EAP counseling of $5.19:$1.00.
    • Lessons learned from EAPs using the Workplace Outcome Suite for counseling: Part 3 of Series with global data from the Workplace Outcome Suite© by Morneau Shepell

      Attridge, Mark; Sharar, David A., 1961-; Veder, Barb; Steenstra, Ivan (Employee Assistance Society of North America, 2020-06)
      This is the final paper in a three-part series based on the Workplace Outcome Suite© (WOS) Annual Report for 2018.1 The WOS is a scientifically validated tool that is offered free to the employee assistance field. This paper profiles 11 employee assistance programs (EAPs) that collected WOS data for counseling cases and two EAPs that collected WOS data for special projects. This sample of EAPs was engaged to represent programs from both the U.S. and other countries. The EAPs ranged in size and delivery model (i.e., external vendor, internal staff, or hybrid of some staff combined with a vendor). The study used a survey to address a variety of questions related to data collection methods, reporting practices, and customer reactions to the results. Best practice recommendations for data collection using the WOS-5 are also identified.
    • Risk Management Approach to Analyzing Outcomes from EAP Counseling: Part 1 of Series with Global Data from the Workplace Outcome Suite© by Morneau Shepell

      Attridge, Mark; Sharar, David A., 1961-; Veder, Barb; Steenstra, Ivan (Employee Assistance Society of North America, 2020-01)
      This is the first paper in a three-part series based on the Workplace Outcome Suite© (WOS) Annual Report for 2018.1 This self-report measurement tool was developed by Chestnut Global Partners in 2010 and is now owned by Morneau Shepell. It is a scientifically validated tool offered free to the employee assistance field. In this paper, we advance a risk management approach to understanding how employee assistance program (EAP) services can be used to greater advantage by employers. This approach uses an alternative procedure for coding the WOS data and for analyzing the results for change over time. This method asks, for each WOS outcome area, how many employees (as a percentage of all EAP cases) are at a problem level on the outcome when first seeking counseling and also at the follow-up? The difference in these two percentages indicates how many cases had improved after counseling to no longer have a “problem” with missing work, or with work engagement, and so on. Self-report data was collected at the start of counseling and at 60-90 days after counseling ended. The sample was 24,363 cases worldwide from multiple EAPs with data collected between years 2010 to 2018. Results found that after deducting the small percentage of cases who changed from no problem at the start to having a problem after use, the net change in rates among EAP users of having a problem in each outcome was significantly reduced: work presenteeism with 56% of cases with problem at before vs. 28% after; life satisfaction with 38% of cases with problem at before to 21% after; work absenteeism with 34% of cases with problem at before vs. 20% after; work engagement with 31% of cases with problem at before vs. 10% after; and workplace distress with 22% of cases with problem at before vs. 9% after. When adding up problem status (yes or no) within person for all five WOS measures (range from 0 to 5 at each time point), the average number of outcome areas with a problem was significantly reduced from 1.81 per case at before to 0.94 at after use. These findings demonstrate that brief counseling was effective at reducing work-related problems of users, even when most employees (82%) had used the EAP for issues other than work. This study shows how a behavioral health risk management approach can be successfully applied to interpreting and reporting on work-related outcomes from EAP counseling.