Recent Submissions

  • Introduction to the International Employee Assistance Digital Archive: A Knowledge Hub

    Jacobson Frey, Jodi; Herlihy, Patricia A. (2020-10-15)
    Dr. Jodi Frey and Dr. Patricia Herlihy, Co-Founders of the University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Social Work, International Employee Assistance Digital Archive offered this presentation for the DC-EAPA Chapter. This overview of the EA Archive provided attendees with information to understand the need for an international digital archive for the EA field, information about important historical documents and current research housed in the EA Archive, and ways in which attendees can get involved with the EA Archive to support the future of the field through submissions, use of the Archive and promotion. The presenters gave attendees a first-hand look inside the EA Archive and various ways to search and review content.
  • Worldwide Guidelines for Mental Health in the Workplace

    Masi, Dale A. (2020-10-20)
    Mission: To create a global movement among professional and employer associations in the development and the alignment of collaborative international guidelines for Behavioral Health Services in the Workplace.
  • Merged Employee Assistance Programs (EAP) Standards: Employee Assistance Society of North America (EASNA) and Council on Accreditation (COA)

    Masi, Dale A. (2000)
    Accreditation applies to institutions and programs, not to individuals. It does not guarantee jobs or businesses for individuals, though being an employee of an accredited program may facilitate further placement or licensing. It speaks to a sense of public trust, as well as to professional quality, and does so through the development of criteria and guidelines for assessing effectiveness, through the process of continuous self-study and review, and through a public commitment to excellence.
  • Should Employees “Check Their Baggage at the Door?”

    Greer, Kathleen (New England Employee Benefits Council, 2020-10-09)
    World Mental Health Day 2020 is October 10, and many workplaces are re-thinking the old notion of “checking baggage at the door.” This practice came from a belief that work was work, home was home, and the only thing separating them was the commute. It was also centered on the belief that mental health issues were shameful and should be hidden from view at the workplace. This fear relates to the stigma associated with mental illness and the belief that vulnerabilities may impact career mobility. Now enter the land of COVID-19 and workplaces are re-thinking this position. The line between work and home has been turned upside down by the pandemic, making it challenging on a number of fronts. In a Kaiser Family Foundation poll1, more than half of Americans report that the coronavirus crisis is harming their mental health. While at least one in five employees typically suffers from a behavioral health condition, many more now feel down or anxious about the pandemic. With so many people suffering in this way, does it make sense to just ignore it? What are the benefits and risks of acknowledging mental health issues and embracing them?
  • EAP Accreditation: New and Improved

    Stockert, Timothy (2003-04-25)
  • Prioritizing Workplace Wellness: Optimizing Mental Health in Uncertain Times

    Jacobson Frey, Jodi (2020-10-01)
    In this interview Dr. Jodi Frey shares her extensive expertise in EAP assessment and planning. She clearly takes us through assessment options, effective planning and the dynamic process of re-evaluation necessary to meet the needs of an ever-changing workplace environment. She addresses how to get the most out of your existing health care plan, prioritizing resources to provide what may be missing and effective strategies to inform and encourage employers to take advantage of the EAP. -- Interview conducted by Ilyssa Bass, PhD for Prioritizing Workplace Wellness, 2020 Global Summit.
  • Case study: EAP outcomes and impact 2020

    CuraLinc Healthcare, 2020
    CuraLinc measured the health and productivity of 7,040 benefit-eligible employees who used the EAP between January 1, 2019, and December 31, 2019. CuraLinc's case managers offered the SPS-6 and WOS to all employees; and offered the PHQ-9 and AUDIT to those who presented with depression and alcohol use, respectively. CuraLinc followed up with participants 30 days after the cased was closed to measure changes in their health and productivity, evaluate their satisfaction with the program and profiled for variations in health status or referrals to other resources. In summary, the data collected by CuraLinc suggests that an EAP with the proper construct and focus can facilitate meaningful behavior change that correlates to a decrease in absenteeism, an increase in productivity and a direct impact on a client's bottom. line. The data also suggests that an EAP does have the ability to improve the health of employees who present with depression or alcohol use problems.
  • Case study: EAP outcomes and impact 2019

    CuraLinc Healthcare, 2019
    CuraLinc measured the health and productivity of 5,761 benefit-eligible employees who used the EAP between January 1, 2018, and December 31, 2018. CuraLinc's case managers offered the SPS-6 and WOS to all employees; and offered the PHQ-9 and AUDIT to those who presented with depression and alcohol use, respectively. CuraLinc followed up with participants 30 days after the case was closed to measure changes in their health and productivity, evaluate their satisfaction with the program and profile for variations in health status or referrals to other resources. In summary, the data collected by CuraLinc suggests that an EAP with the proper construct and focus can facilitate meaningful behavior change that correlates to a decrease in absenteeism, an increase in productivity and a direct impact on a client's bottom line. The data also suggests that an EAP does have the ability to improve the health of employees who present with depression or alcohol use problems.
  • Case study: EAP outcomes and impact 2018

    CuraLinc Healthcare, 2018
    CuraLinc measured the health and productivity of 3,379 benefit-eligible employees who used the EAP between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2017. CuraLinc's case managers offered the SPS-6 and WOS to all employees; and offered the PHQ-9 and AUDIT to those who presented with depression and alcohol use, respectively. CuraLinc followed up with participants 30 days after the cased was closed to measure changes in their health and productivity, evaluate their satisfaction with the program and profiled for variations in health status or referrals to other resources. In summary, the data collected by CuraLinc suggests that an EAP with the proper construct and focus can facilitate meaningful behavior change that correlates to a decrease in absenteeism, an increase in productivity and a direct impact on a client's bottom line. The data also suggests that an EAP does have the ability to improve the health of employees who present with depression or alcohol use problems.
  • The history of employee assistance programs in the United States

    Masi, Dale A. (Employee Assistance Professionals Association, 2020-10-01)
    This article is an excerpt from the comprehensive book, History of Employee Assistance Programs in the United States (full book available here in the EA Archive - http://hdl.handle.net/10713/12002). In this excerpt, the author, Dr. Dale Masi, writes about the historical beginnings of the EAP field in the U.S. with its roots in occupational social work and occupational alcoholism. She discusses topics such as welfare capitalism and early leaders of the EAP movement in large workplaces in the U.S.
  • EAP Utilization: EAP field doesn't do itself justice

    Masi, Dale A.
    Dr. Dale Masi writes about a new way of measuring EAP utilization with a focus on cumulative use of the EAP over the course of years rather than measuring individual use over just one year. Dr. Masi encourages the EAP field to consider different ways to define and count utilization to more accurately demonstrate value and show uptake over time.
  • The Future of Employee Assistance Education: Reflections from a University Professor

    Jacobson Frey, Jodi (Employee Assistance Professionals Association, 2020-10-01)
    Dr. Jodi Frey, Professor, University of Maryland and Chair of the Social Work in the Workplace & Employee Assistance Sub-specialization writes about the future of employee assistance education and the need to advocate for the value that EAPs bring to the workplace. Further, she writes about the importance of evidence-based research infused into education and training - both at the graduate level and continuing education. Finally, Dr. Frey discusses the importance of developing and providing real-time education for students through field placements or internships and how these arrangements can also impact succession planning.
  • EP60: History of EAPs

    Masi, Dale A. (National Association of Social Workers, 2020-09-29)
    Dale A. Masi, PhD, LCSW-C, CEAP, is Professor Emeritus at University of Maryland and author of "The History of Employee Assistance Programs in the United States." She talks to us about the social work roots of EAPs. Employee assistance programs (EAPs) offer resources to help individuals address personal issues that may be affecting their work performance, health and emotional well-being. EAPs can help reduce absenteeism, increase productivity, and increase satisfaction and loyalty.
  • Ask the Expert: Suicide Awareness and Prevention in the Workplace

    Vergolias, George; Gorter, Jeff (R3 Continuum, 2020-09-25)
    This webinar presents an overview of workplace suicide prevention and response with attention to awareness, workplace leadership and supportive workplace programming. The presenters also introduce the audience to the National Guidelines for Workplace Suicide Prevention (www.WorkplaceSuicidePrevention.com)
  • EAP and COVID-19: The Four PIllars of New Retirement

    Dychtwald, Ken, 1950- (Edward Jones, 2020)
  • EAP and COVID-19: Why HR Leaders Need to Cultivate Their Adaptive Capacity

    Gorter, Jeff (2020-09-11)
    It goes without saying that HR professionals are no strangers to change. Dealing with the unexpected, responding to crises, and managing the human side of business fluctuations are central to any HR leader’s role in a company. But 2020 has brought an unprecedented series of challenges, from the COVID-19 pandemic to civil unrest to widespread economic distress. Addressing the HR needs of your organization in the midst of a fluid and rapidly evolving dynamic requires rapid reassessment and frequent course corrections on almost a daily basis. It requires adaptive capacity. What Is Adaptive Capacity?
  • Zoom Exhaustion is Real. Here are Six Ways to Find Balance & Stay Connected

    Hickman, Steven D. (Mindful.org, 2020-04-06)
    I’ve been teaching mindfulness and compassion for about twenty years now, and I believe I thrive when I’m sitting with a group of people open to exploring this transformative practice. Friends and family have known me to “come alive” when I am teaching and I feel a familiar surge of excitement and animation when I have those opportunities. But the other day, a colleague invited me to co-teach a short compassion session online with her. I deeply appreciated the invitation but immediately declined because I just haven’t felt like a teacher since this virus invaded our lives. I’ve worked my tail off in other ways, but something had me holding back from teaching. I knew in my bones that I couldn’t do this, but that made me curious.

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