• Minority student success in predominantly white schools of nursing: Cognitive and noncognitive factors

      Rodgers, Shielda Glover; Holt, Frieda M. (1991)
      The purpose of this study was to examine the nature of the relationship of selected cognitive and noncognitive factors to academic success of minority nursing students enrolled in predominantly white schools of nursing. In this study, the relationship between academic success (college grade point average) and the cognitive factors of high school grade point average and SAT score and the noncognitive factors of social isolation, self concept of ability, and self esteem was investigated. The theoretical framework for the study was based on Tracey and Sedlacek's model for predicting college success using noncognitive factors. Students from five NLN accredited baccalaureate schools of nursing in Virginia and Maryland participated in the study. A four part questionnaire was administered to the students which consisted of the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale, the modified Brookover Self Concept of Ability Scale, the social isolation subscale of the UCLA Loneliness Scale and a demographic/academic data questionnaire. The student's cumulative grade point average at the end of the semester in which data collection occurred was obtained from university officials and all other academic data was self reported on the questionnaire. There were 40 black students, 33 other minority students and 117 white students in the study. Data were analyzed using regression analysis, discriminant analysis, frequency distributions, Chi Square and Pearson Product Moment Correlation. Results indicated that for the total sample of nursing students, those factors which were predictive of success were self concept of ability, self esteem, and SAT scores. For black nursing students, those factors which were predictive of success were self concept of ability and high school grade point average. For other minority students the only factor predictive of success was high school grade point average. The three groups of students (Blacks, Whites, Other minorities) included in this study differed significantly on their scores on ratings of self esteem, social isolation and college grade point average. Black students had higher levels of self esteem and social isolation, but lower college grade point averages than either whites or other minorities. No demographic characteristic correlated significantly with college grade point average for either group of minority students. Black students were significantly older and more likely to be employed than either of the other two groups. The findings from this study suggest that a combination of cognitive and noncognitive factors should be explored when attempting to predict success for black students.