• Case Study: Implementation of Electronic Health Record Using Rogers’s Diffusion of Innovation Theory

      Estrada, Rosario; Heider, Gerti, Ph.D., M.S.N. (2014)
      The intended outcome of this project was to gain insight how technological advances are diffused across nursing units and to determine the effect of the use of an EHR on nurses’ attitudes and users’ satisfaction before and after system implementation. Understanding the nurses' attitude and satisfaction can provide information on how to formulate effective strategies in the implementation of an EHR, thus, ensuring an EHR that supports patient quality care and improvement of patient outcome. Rogers's Innovation-Diffusion Theory was used to guide the study.
    • Clinical Decision Support for Fall Risk Assessment and Plan of Care

      Lytle, Kay (2015-07)
      Objectives: • Discuss variations in process outcomes for falls documentation of a quality improvement project using clinical decision support. • Compare the clinical outcomes for falls-­related quality improvement project using clinical decision support. • Discuss lessons learned in implementation and evaluation of clinical decision support tools
    • Promoting admission in active labor for childbirth: Triage dynamics and early labor lounge use

      Breman, Rachel Blankstein; Johantgen, Mary E. (2018)
      Background: Cesarean birth is the most common surgery amongst women of reproductive age and nearly one third of term pregnant women will birth via cesarean. All professional organizations involved in intrapartum care are advocating for reducing the rate. Overwhelming evidence supports admission in active labor as an effective strategy to promote vaginal birth. Yet, how this evidence translates into decision-making during triage is unknown. Use of an early labor lounge (ELL) as an alternative to hospital admission is one care innovation that has not been evaluated. Purpose: The study aims were to: 1) examine the dynamics of triage from the clinician perspective, and 2) explore the facilitators and barriers to use of an ELL by clinicians. Patient use of the ELL and satisfaction was also explored. Methods: A mixed methods approach was used. Semi-structured interviews of clinical staff were conducted using a qualitative descriptive approach to explore the triage and admission process. A framework analysis utilized the domains of the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) to identify barriers and facilitators to ELL use. Surveys examined the satisfaction of women after childbirth; for women using the ELL, their experience was also assessed. Results: Interviews revealed the decision-making triad among the pregnant woman, the provider, and the triage nurse that influences admission. The category that emerged is "Admission of Low-Risk Pregnant Women Depends on Many Factors." Four themes revealed were: 1) woman's expectation about birth, 2) woman's coping with labor, 3) variation in care management, and, 4) maternal and fetal safety. Several barriers and facilitators to ELL use were identified. A higher proportion of ELL users received their prenatal care from a midwife, were informed about the ELL during their prenatal visits, and experienced vaginal deliveries. Conclusion: Obstetrical triage is a complex process with multiple factors to be considered when deciding to admit a woman in labor. The decision making process and the use of an ELL must be further examined in a variety of settings to get a better understanding of context, birth outcomes and satisfaction with birth.
    • A qualitative analysis of the implementation of a complex intervention: evaluating implementation of the Trauma Survivors Network

      Frey, Katherine Parris; Lipscomb, Jane (2017)
      Background: Annually, two million adults are admitted to US hospitals due to traumatic injury. The trauma recovery process often brings physical and psychological challenges. The Trauma Survivors Network (TSN) is a multimodal program designed to improve outcomes for this population. However, despite early efforts at dissemination, widespread adoption of the program remains low. Understanding barriers and facilitators to adoption and implementation is a common challenge in intervention development and dissemination generally, representing a knowledge gap in planning for the implementation of complex, behavior change interventions more specifically. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to qualitatively assess the implementation of the TSN at 6 trauma centers using a combination of prospective documentation and retrospective interviews. The implementation process at each of the participating centers was analyzed and compared to rate implementation strength. Specific barriers and facilitators to program implementation were identified. Methods: In this qualitative multiple case study, data sources included implementation logs (6), diary entries (147), and semi-structured interviews with key informants (37). Each of the centers was considered an analytic case. Data analysis followed a primarily deductive approach, using a coding framework based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research and the Theoretical Domains Framework. Matrices of themes and cases were constructed, allowing the evaluation constructs at the case and study level. Results: The result of this research is the development of a model of program implementation proposing the factors most likely to result in successful implementation of the TSN. Implementation requires leaders at local centers to recognize the need for the program, and working with a dedicated coordinator and engaged opinion leaders, provide the time, support, and resources necessary to demonstrate program continuity and value to staff. This process is facilitated by external, national level support for the program, including the potential incorporation of the TSN into guidelines for trauma center verification, as well as the design of internal processes intended to integrate the program into the center, ensuring acceptance and longevity for the program. The results of this study can assist future adopters of the TSN, improving the likelihood of successful program implementation.