• The Evolution of External Employee Assistance Programs Since the Advent of Managed Behavioral Health Organizations

      Sandys, Jay E.; Straussner, Shulamith Lala Ashenberg; Stanhope, Victoria; Thorning, Helle; Hughes, Daniel (Proquest, 2012-05-10)
      Employee assistance programs (EAPs) evolved due to market changes, including the emergence of managed behavioral health organizations (MBHOs), and pressure to be defined as a healthcare benefit instead of a workplace productivity tool. This study used a qualitative, grounded theory methodology to interview 26 top leaders at external, non-MBHO EAPs in the United States. Complex adaptive systems, industry life cycle, and organizational life cycle theories assisted in the interpretation of organizational change. Emergent findings include three primary changing market themes, and seven primary survival strategy themes. Influenced by social workers in the industry, EAPs adapted in a unique way that incorporates both business and social service values. Along with more sophisticated business practices, EAPs continue to focus on human services. While most services kept focus on workplace productivity, some EAPs offer services that do not have a workplace focus, a change that may threaten the ongoing viability of the program.
    • The History of Employee Assistance Programs: A 50 Year Perspective (U.S. and Canada) - 1

      Masi, Dale A.; Jacobson Frey, Jodi; Tisone, Carl (2016-06-15)
      Funded by the Employee Assistance Research Foundation, this is the first of eight videos completed as part of the EAP History of the U.S. and Canada project by MASI Research Consultants, Inc. and the University of Maryland, Baltimore School of Social Work. This video presents Carl Tisone being interviewed by Dale Masi. Carl founded the Employee Assistance Research Foundation and was Owner and Founder of Personal Performance Consultants(PPC) and PPC International. He discusses managed care as well as the development of international EAPs.
    • The History of Employee Assistance Programs: A 50 Year Perspective (U.S. and Canada) - 5

      Masi, Dale A.; Jacobson Frey, Jodi; Burke, John J., M.A. (2016-09-14)
      Funded by the Employee Assistance Research Foundation, this is the fifth of eight videos completed as part of the EAP History of the U.S. and Canada project by MASI Research Consultants, Inc. and the University of Maryland, Baltimore School of Social Work. This video shows John Burke, a leading EAP consultant, being interviewed by Dale Masi. John explains the impact of managed care on EAPs as well as the growth of mergers and acquisitions.
    • Integrated employee assistance program/managed behavioral health plan utilization by persons with substance use disorders

      Merrick, Elizabeth S. Levy; Hodgkin, Dominic; Hiatt, Deirdre; Horgan, Constance M.; Greenfield, Shelly F.; McCann, Bernard A. (2011)
      New federal parity and health reform legislation, promising increased behavioral health care access and a focus on prevention, has heightened interest in employee assistance programs (EAPs). This study investigated service utilization by persons with a primary substance use disorder (SUD) diagnosis in a managed behavioral health care (MBHC) organization's integrated EAP/MBHC product (N = 1,158). In 2004, 25.0% of clients used the. EAP first for new treatment episodes. After initial EAP utilization, 44.4% received no additional formal services through the plan, and 40.4% received regular outpatient services. Overall, outpatient care, intensive outpatient/day treatment, and inpatient/residential detoxification were most common. About half of the clients had co-occurring psychiatric diagnoses. Mental health service utilization was extensive. Findings suggest that for service users with primary SUD diagnoses in an integrated EAP/MBHC product, the EAP benefit plays a key role at the front end of treatment and is often only one component of treatment episodes.
    • Risk Shifting and Managed Care: Should EAP's Be Concerned?

      Cagney, Tamara (Stevens Publishing Corporation, 1992-02)