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dc.contributor.authorPassarella, Letitia Logan
dc.contributor.authorBorn, Catherine E.
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-21T12:13:19Z
dc.date.available2024-05-21T12:13:19Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/22280
dc.descriptionThe practice of imputing income to full-time minimum wage for unemployed or under-employed noncustodial parents (NCPs) does little to ensure that NCPs have the ability to pay their child support obligations and often results in low payment compliance and debt. In Maryland, fewer than one in ten NCPs had income imputed for the determination of current support obligations. While it was not a common statewide practice, a few jurisdictions had rates of imputed income as high as 33%. Additionally, those with imputed income had lower employment participation, lower earnings, and paid a substantially smaller portion of their child support obligation, compared to those whose actual earned income was used for the determination of child support.
dc.subjectimputed income
dc.subjectpayment compliance
dc.subjectemployment
dc.subjectability to pay
dc.subject.otherPayment Compliance
dc.titleImputed Income among Noncustodial Parents: Characteristics and Payment Outcomes
dc.typeChild Support
refterms.dateFOA2024-05-21T12:13:19Z
dc.coverage.jurisdictionStatewide


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