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dc.contributor.authorKleckner, Amber S
dc.contributor.authorvan Wijngaarden, Edwin
dc.contributor.authorJusko, Todd A
dc.contributor.authorKleckner, Ian R
dc.contributor.authorLin, Po-Ju
dc.contributor.authorMustian, Karen M
dc.contributor.authorPeppone, Luke J
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-27T12:50:38Z
dc.date.available2022-09-27T12:50:38Z
dc.date.issued2022-03-31
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/19843
dc.description.abstractCancer-related fatigue is a prevalent, debilitating condition, and preliminary evidence suggests a relationship between higher diet quality and lower fatigue. Serum-based carotenoids, Vitamin A, and Vitamin E are biomarkers of fruit and vegetable intake and therefore diet quality. To further elucidate the link between diet quality and cancer-related fatigue, associations were assessed between these serum-based nutrients and fatigue among American adults with special attention to cancer history. Data were analyzed from the United States 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) dataset. Ten carotenoids, vitamin A, vitamin E, and γ-tocopherol were measured from fasting blood samples and fatigue was patient-reported. Associations between carotenoid concentration and fatigue were estimated using ordinal logistic regression models. Adjusted models included a diagnosis of cancer (with the exception on non-melanoma skin cancer, yes/no), age, body mass index, race/ethnicity, education, and exercise habits as covariates, and additional models included a cancer×nutrient interaction. Of 4091 participants, 272 (8.0%) reported a history of cancer. Greater fatigue was associated with lower serum trans-lycopene, retinyl palmitate, and retinyl stearate (all p<0.05) in separate models adjusting for potential confounders. For these nutrients, a one-standard deviation increase in nutrient was associated with a 6.8-9.9% lower risk of greater fatigue. Among cancer survivors only (n=272), statistically significant associations were not observed between any of the nutrients and fatigue. In conclusion, greater serum concentrations of carotenoid biomarkers were associated with less fatigue. These results support further exploration into relationships between carotenoid intake, diet quality, and persistent fatigue.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi:10.1158/2767-9764.crc-21-0172en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relationThe data analyzed in this study are publicly available from NHANES.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofCancer research communicationsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes/en_US
dc.subjectNHANESen_US
dc.subjectcancer-related fatigueen_US
dc.subjectcarotenoidsen_US
dc.subjectfatigueen_US
dc.subjectnutritionen_US
dc.subjectsurvivorshipen_US
dc.titleSerum carotenoids and cancer-related fatigue: An analysis of the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1158/2767-9764.crc-21-0172
dc.identifier.pmid36134125
dc.source.journaltitleCancer research communications
dc.source.volume2
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage202
dc.source.endpage210
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States


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