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dc.contributor.authordosReis, Susan
dc.contributor.authorBozzi, Laura M
dc.contributor.authorButler, Beverly
dc.contributor.authorXie, Richard Z
dc.contributor.authorChapman, Richard H
dc.contributor.authorBright, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorMalik, Erica
dc.contributor.authorSlejko, Julia F
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-21T16:25:12Z
dc.date.available2022-09-21T16:25:12Z
dc.date.issued2022-09-19
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/19826
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The goals of this formative research are to elicit attributes of treatment and desired outcomes that are important to individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD), to develop a stated preference instrument, and to pre-test the instrument. Methods: A three-phase survey study design elicited the patient's journey with MDD to design and pre-test the discrete choice experiment (DCE) instrument. Participants were 20 adults aged ≥ 18 with MDD who did not also have bipolar disorder or post-partum depression. We engaged patient advocates and a multi-disciplinary stakeholder advisory group to select and refine attributes for inclusion in a DCE instrument. The DCE was incorporated into a survey that also collected depression treatment and management and sociodemographic characteristics. The DCE was pre-tested with ten adults with MDD. Results: Six attributes were included in the DCE: mode of treatment (medicine only, psychotherapy only, all modalities including brain stimulation), time to treatment effect (6, 9, 12 weeks), days of hopefulness (2, 4, 6 days/week), effect on productivity (40%, 60%, 90% increase), relations with others (strained, improved, no impact), and out-of-pocket costs ($30, $60, $90/month). The DCE test led to the refinement of mode of treatment (medicine, medicine and psychotherapy, and all modalities); time to treatment effect (4, 6, 9 weeks); monthly out-of-pocket costs ($30, $90, $270). Conclusions: MDD treatment preferences revealed trade-offs among mode of treatment, time to treatment effect, functional outcomes, and cost. The findings demonstrate the potential for meaningfully incorporating the patient experience in preference measures.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi:10.1007/s40271-022-00596-6en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relationAll data are provided in the supplemental material or in the tables; the authors have made all data available.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe patienten_US
dc.rights© 2022. The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.en_US
dc.titlePreferences for Treatments for Major Depressive Disorder: Formative Qualitative Research Using the Patient Experience.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s40271-022-00596-6
dc.identifier.pmid36121615
dc.source.journaltitleThe patient
dc.identifier.eissn1178-1661
dc.source.countryNew Zealand
dc.identifier.journalThe patient


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