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dc.contributor.authorWolf, Gideon
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-13T14:23:16Z
dc.date.available2022-09-13T14:23:16Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/19740
dc.descriptionUniversity of Maryland, Baltimore. Molecular Microbiology and Immunology. Ph.D. 2022.en_US
dc.description.abstractT cell activation occurs when a T cell receptor (TCR) engages with cognate agonistic peptides in the context of Major Histocompatibility Complexes (pMHCs) on antigen presenting cells (APCs). This initiates a series of intracellular signaling events proximal to the TCR and associated CD3 complexes, mediated by unique kinases together with scaffolding and lattice molecules. The downstream cascades ultimately lead to transcriptional changes that promote the cellular program of conventional T cell activation—for example, cytoskeletal rearrangement, cytokine production, cellular proliferation, and differentiation. Understanding signaling mechanisms not only allows us to decipher the regulation of T cell activation but also to manipulate immune responses pharmacologically. TCR signaling by agonistic pMHCs is well studied, but much less is known about signaling by a parallel universe of self-peptides that also engage TCRs in vivo. The focus of this thesis is to understand how T cells perceive these signals without fully acquiring effector responses as a result. The central hypothesis of my thesis is that self-peptide ligands signal uniquely through the TCR to alter the fate and function of a T cell both with and without presence of their cognate agonist. We evaluated this hypothesis using approaches that globally increased self-peptide presentation in vivo (using FLT3L to generate more DCs), deprived T cells of self-peptide (by culturing away from APCs) or stimulated a TCR with a known self-peptide in the presence or absence of the strong agonist. The significant findings from these studies are that (i) boosting self-peptide presentation transiently increases a narrow T cell effector subset; (ii) depriving T cells of self-engagement lowers basal phosphorylation in the key signaling adapter LAT; (iii) self-peptides do not trigger cellular activation on their own, but synergize to enhance activation as measured by CD69, pERK, and several other parameters (iv) self-peptides initiate TCR signaling up to the level of pMEK and (v) self-peptides elicit a unique transcriptional profile. Together, these results not only define the unique contributions of self-peptides to T cell activation but also demonstrate a distinct wiring profile in the TCR-signaling network that limits self-peptide sensing at the ERK step.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Antigen, T-Cellen_US
dc.subject.meshT-Lymphocytesen_US
dc.subject.meshPeptidesen_US
dc.titleNovel Modules in the T Cell Signaling Circuit Which Enable Synergy Between Responses to Self and Foreign Peptidesen_US
dc.typedissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2022-09-06T19:12:49Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.contributor.advisorSingh, Nevil


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