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dc.contributor.authorMontoya, Nina R
dc.contributor.authorPorsch, Eric A
dc.contributor.authorMuñoz, Vanessa L
dc.contributor.authorMuszyński, Artur
dc.contributor.authorVlach, Jiri
dc.contributor.authorHahn, David K
dc.contributor.authorAzadi, Parastoo
dc.contributor.authorSherman, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorYang, Hyojik
dc.contributor.authorChandler, Courtney E
dc.contributor.authorErnst, Robert K
dc.contributor.authorSt Geme, Joseph W
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-09T14:16:01Z
dc.date.available2022-09-09T14:16:01Z
dc.date.issued2022-09-07
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/19708
dc.description.abstractKingella kingae is a leading cause of bone and joint infections and other invasive diseases in young children. A key K. kingae virulence determinant is a secreted exopolysaccharide that mediates resistance to serum complement and neutrophils and is required for full pathogenicity. The K. kingae exopolysaccharide is a galactofuranose homopolymer called galactan and is encoded by the pamABC genes in the pamABCDE locus. In this study, we sought to define the mechanism by which galactan is tethered on the bacterial surface, a prerequisite for mediating evasion of host immune mechanisms. We found that the pamD and pamE genes encode glycosyltransferases and are required for synthesis of an atypical lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen. The LPS O-antigen in turn is required for anchoring of galactan, a novel mechanism for association of an exopolysaccharide with the bacterial surface. IMPORTANCE Kingella kingae is an emerging pediatric pathogen and produces invasive disease by colonizing the oropharynx, invading the bloodstream, and disseminating to distant sites. This organism produces a uniquely multifunctional exopolysaccharide called galactan that is critical for virulence and promotes intravascular survival by mediating resistance to serum and neutrophils. In this study, we established that at least some galactan is anchored to the bacterial surface via a novel structural interaction with an atypical lipopolysaccharide O-antigen. Additionally, we demonstrated that the atypical O-antigen is synthesized by the products of the pamD and pamE genes, located downstream of the gene cluster responsible for galactan biosynthesis. This work addresses how the K. kingae exopolysaccharide can mediate innate immune resistance and advances understanding of bacterial exopolysaccharides and lipopolysaccharides.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1128/mbio.02295-22en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBacteriologyen_US
dc.subjectGram-negative bacteriaen_US
dc.subjectexopolysaccharideen_US
dc.subjectlipopolysaccharideen_US
dc.subjectpathogenesisen_US
dc.titleSurface Anchoring of the Kingella kingae Galactan Is Dependent on the Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/mbio.02295-22
dc.identifier.pmid36069736
dc.source.journaltitlemBio
dc.source.beginpagee0229522
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States


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