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dc.contributor.authorMazaheri, Ali
dc.contributor.authorSeminowicz, David A
dc.contributor.authorFurman, Andrew J
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-17T13:14:27Z
dc.date.available2022-08-17T13:14:27Z
dc.date.issued2022-08-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/19584
dc.description.abstractThe study by Valentini et al (2022) observed that the peak alpha frequency (PAF) of participants became slower after they were exposed to painful, as well as non-painful but unpleasant stimuli. The authors interpreted this as a challenge to our previous studies which propose that the speed of resting PAF, independently of pain-induced changes to PAF, can be a reliable biomarker marker for gauging individual pain sensitivity. While investigations into the role that PAF plays in pain perception are timely, we have some concerns about the assumptions and methodology employed by Valentini et al. Moreover, we believe the authors here have also misrepresented some of our previous work. In the current commentary, we detail the critical differences between our respective studies, with the ultimate aim of guiding future investigations.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroImageen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022. Published by Elsevier Inc.en_US
dc.titlePeak alpha frequency as a candidate biomarker of pain sensitivity: the importance of distinguishing slow from slowing.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2022.119560
dc.identifier.pmid35973563
dc.source.journaltitleNeuroImage
dc.source.beginpage119560
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States


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