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dc.contributor.authorLee, David Uihwan
dc.contributor.authorFan, Gregory Hongyuan
dc.contributor.authorChang, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorLee, Ki Jung
dc.contributor.authorHan, John
dc.contributor.authorJung, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorKwon, Jean
dc.contributor.authorKaragozian, Raffi
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-10T12:31:01Z
dc.date.available2022-08-10T12:31:01Z
dc.date.issued2022-07
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/19544
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: This study systematically evaluated the implications of advanced age on post-surgical outcomes following gastrectomy for gastric cancer using a national database. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The 2011-2017 National Inpatient Sample was used to isolate patients who underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer. From this, the population was stratified into those belonging to the younger age cohort (18-59 years), sexagenarians, septuagenarians, and octogenarians. The younger cohort and each advanced age category were compared in terms of the following endpoints: mortality following surgery, length of hospital stay, charges, and surgical complications. RESULTS: This study included a total of 5,213 patients: 1,366 sexagenarians, 1,490 septuagenarians, 743 octogenarians, and 1,614 under 60 years of age. Between the younger cohort and sexagenarians, there was no difference in mortality (2.27 vs. 1.67%; P=0.30; odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81-2.30), length of stay (11.0 vs. 11.1 days; P=0.86), or charges ($123,557 vs. $124,425; P=0.79). Compared to the younger cohort, septuagenarians had higher rates of in-hospital mortality (4.30% vs. 1.67%; P<0.01; OR, 2.64; 95% CI, 1.67-4.16), length of stay (12.1 vs. 11.1 days; P<0.01), and charges ($139,200 vs. $124,425; P<0.01). In the multivariate analysis, septuagenarians had higher mortality (P=0.01; adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.01; 95% CI, 1.18-3.43). Similarly, compared to the younger cohort, octogenarians had a higher rate of mortality (7.67% vs. 1.67%; P<0.001; OR, 4.88; 95% CI, 3.06-7.79), length of stay (12.3 vs. 11.1 days; P<0.01), and charges ($131,330 vs. $124,425; P<0.01). In the multivariate analysis, octogenarians had higher mortality (P<0.001; aOR, 4.03; 95% CI, 2.28-7.11). CONCLUSIONS: Advanced age (>70 years) is an independent risk factor for postoperative death in patients with gastric cancer undergoing gastrectomy.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.5230/jgc.2022.22.e18en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKorean Gastric Cancer Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Gastric Canceren_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022. Korean Gastric Cancer Association.en_US
dc.subjectAgeden_US
dc.subjectElderlyen_US
dc.subjectGastrectomyen_US
dc.subjectGastric canceren_US
dc.subjectGeriatric medicineen_US
dc.titleThe Clinical Impact of Advanced Age on the Postoperative Outcomes of Patients Undergoing Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer: Analysis Across US Hospitals Between 2011-2017.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.5230/jgc.2022.22.e18
dc.identifier.pmid35938366
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of gastric cancer
dc.source.volume22
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage197
dc.source.endpage209
dc.source.countryKorea (South)


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