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dc.contributor.authorMorhason-Bello, Imran O
dc.contributor.authorAdebamowo, Clement A
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-05T11:43:15Z
dc.date.available2022-08-05T11:43:15Z
dc.date.issued2022-08-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/19519
dc.description.abstractObjective: Studies, mainly from high-income countries, suggest that there are ethnic and racial variations in prevalence of uterine fibroids (UF). However, there have been few studies of the epidemiology of UF in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). We reviewed published articles on the epidemiology of UF in SSA. Design: This was a scoping review of literature. Settings: We searched three databases (PubMed, African Wide Information (EBSCO) and African Journals OnLine (AJOL)). The search for eligible articles was conducted between December 2019 and January 2021. Primary and secondary outcome measures: To describe the reported prevalence/incidence of, and risk factors for UF in SSA. Results: Of the 1052 articles retrieved, 9 met the inclusion criteria for review. The articles were from Nigeria (4/9), Ghana (2/9), Cameroon (1/9), Kenya (1/9) and South Africa (1/9). Two studies from pathology departments and three studies from radiology departments reported prevalence of UF. We did not find any study on the incidence or genomics of UF in SSA. Of the three studies that reported on the risk factors of UF, only one case-control study that was conducted using retrospective data of attendees at a gynaecological clinic conducted multivariable analysis. Conclusion: There is lack of robust epidemiological studies of the prevalence, incidence and risk factors of UF in SSA. There is urgent need to study epidemiological and genomics risk factors of UF in SSA because UF is the most common gynaecological neoplasm in this population where it is associated with significant morbidity and occasional, usually perioperative, mortality.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2021-052053en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMJ Openen_US
dc.rights© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2022. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.en_US
dc.subjectEPIDEMIOLOGYen_US
dc.subjectGYNAECOLOGYen_US
dc.subjectPUBLIC HEALTHen_US
dc.titleEpidemiology of uterine fibroid in black African women: a systematic scoping review.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2021-052053
dc.identifier.pmid35922099
dc.source.journaltitleBMJ open
dc.source.volume12
dc.source.issue8
dc.source.beginpagee052053
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryEngland


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