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dc.contributor.authorLankford, Allison
dc.contributor.authorRoland, Laura
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorChow, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorKeneally, Ryan
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Amanda
dc.contributor.authorDouglas, Rundell
dc.contributor.authorBerger, Jeffrey
dc.contributor.authorMazzeffi, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-23T19:59:35Z
dc.date.available2022-06-23T19:59:35Z
dc.date.issued2022-06-16
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/19254
dc.description.abstractBackground: Potentially preventable complications are monitored as part of the Maryland Hospital Acquired Conditions Program and are used to adjust hospital reimbursement. Few studies have evaluated racial-ethnic disparities in potentially preventable complications. Our study objective was to explore whether racial-ethnic disparities in potentially preventable complications after Cesarean delivery exist in Maryland. Methods: We performed a retrospective observational cohort study using data from the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission database. All patients having Cesarean delivery, who had race-ethnicity data between fiscal years 2016 and 2020 were included. Multivariable logistic regression modeling was performed to estimate risk-adjusted odds of having a potentially preventable complication in patients of different race-ethnicity. Results: There were 101,608 patients who had Cesarean delivery in 33 hospitals during the study period and met study inclusion criteria. Among them, 1,772 patients (1.7%), experienced at least one potentially preventable complication. Patients who had a potentially preventable complication were older, had higher admission severity of illness, and had more government insurance. They also had more chronic hypertension and pre-eclampsia (both P<0.001). Median length of hospital stay was longer in patients who had a potentially preventable complications (4 days vs. 3 days, P<0.001) and median hospital charges were approximately $4,600 dollars higher, (P<0.001). The odds of having a potential preventable complication differed significantly by race-ethnicity group (P=0.05). Hispanic patients and Non-Hispanic Black patients had higher risk-adjusted odds of having a potentially preventable complication compared to Non-Hispanic White patients, OR=1.26 (95% CI=1.05 to 1.52) and OR=1.17 (95% CI=1.03 to 1.33) respectively. Conclusions: In Maryland a small percentage of patients undergoing Cesarean delivery experienced a potentially preventable complication with Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Black patients disproportionately impacted. Continued efforts are needed to reduce potentially preventable complications and obstetric disparities in Maryland.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12884-022-04818-5en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Pregnancy and Childbirthen_US
dc.rights© 2022. The Author(s).en_US
dc.subjectCesarean deliveryen_US
dc.subjectDisparitiesen_US
dc.subjectHealthcare qualityen_US
dc.subjectObstetricsen_US
dc.titleRacial-ethnic disparities in potentially preventable complications after cesarean delivery in Maryland: an observational cohort study.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12884-022-04818-5
dc.identifier.pmid35710376
dc.source.journaltitleBMC pregnancy and childbirth
dc.source.volume22
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage494
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryEngland


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