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dc.contributor.authorMcKay, Susannah L
dc.contributor.authorVlachos, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorDaniels, Jonathan B
dc.contributor.authorAlbrecht, Valerie S
dc.contributor.authorStevens, Valerie A
dc.contributor.authorRasheed, J Kamile
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, J Kristie
dc.contributor.authorLutgring, Joseph D
dc.contributor.authorSjölund-Karlsson, Maria
dc.contributor.authorHalpin, Alison Laufer
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-21T14:34:37Z
dc.date.available2022-06-21T14:34:37Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-27
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/19218
dc.description.abstractHealthcare-associated carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) infections are a serious threat associated with global epidemic clones and a variety of carbapenemase gene classes. In this study, we describe the molecular epidemiology, including whole-genome sequencing analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of 92 selected, nonredundant CRAB collected through public health efforts in the United States from 2013 to 2017. Among the 92 isolates, the Oxford (OX) multilocus sequence typing scheme identified 30 sequence types (STs); the majority of isolates (n = 59, 64%) represented STs belonging to the international clonal complex 92 (CC92OX). Among these, ST208OX (n = 21) and ST281OX (n = 20) were the most common. All isolates carried an OXA-type carbapenemase gene, comprising 20 alleles. Ninety isolates (98%) encoded an intrinsic OXA-51-like enzyme; 67 (73%) harbored an additional acquired blaOXA gene, most commonly blaOXA-23 (n = 45; 49%). Compared with isolates harboring only intrinsic oxacillinase genes, acquired blaOXA gene presence was associated with higher prevalence of resistance and a higher median minimum inhibitory concentration to the carbapenem imipenem (64 μg/mL vs. 8 μg/mL), and antibiotics from other drug classes, including penicillin, aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, and polymyxins. These data illustrate the wide distribution of CC92OX and high prevalence of acquired blaOXA carbapenemase genes among CRAB in the United States.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1089/mdr.2021.0352en_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/35639112/en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert Inc.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofMicrobial Drug Resistance (Larchmont, N.Y.)en_US
dc.subjectAcinetobacter baumanniien_US
dc.subjectMLSTen_US
dc.subjectWGSen_US
dc.subjectcarbapenem resistanceen_US
dc.subjecthealthcare-associated infectionsen_US
dc.subjectmolecular epidemiologyen_US
dc.titleMolecular Epidemiology of Carbapenem-Resistant in the United States, 2013-2017.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/mdr.2021.0352
dc.identifier.pmid35639112
dc.source.journaltitleMicrobial drug resistance (Larchmont, N.Y.)
dc.source.volume28
dc.source.issue6
dc.source.beginpage645
dc.source.endpage653
dc.source.countryUnited States


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