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dc.contributor.authorKessler, Christian S
dc.contributor.authorJeitler, Michael
dc.contributor.authorDhiman, Kartar S
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Abhimanyu
dc.contributor.authorOstermann, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorGupta, Shivenarain
dc.contributor.authorMorandi, Antonio
dc.contributor.authorMittwede, Martin
dc.contributor.authorStapelfeldt, Elmar
dc.contributor.authorSpoo, Michaela
dc.contributor.authorIcke, Katja
dc.contributor.authorMichalsen, Andreas
dc.contributor.authorWitt, Claudia M
dc.contributor.authorWischnewsky, Manfred B
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-14T15:24:44Z
dc.date.available2022-06-14T15:24:44Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-28
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/19164
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Ayurveda is widely practiced in South Asia in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of these secondary data analyses were to identify the most relevant variables for treatment response and group differences between Ayurvedic therapy compared to conventional therapy in knee OA patients. METHODS: A total of 151 patients (Ayurveda n = 77, conventional care n = 74) were analyzed according to the intention-to-treat principle in a randomized controlled trial. Different statistical approaches including generalized linear models, a radial basis function (RBF) network, exhausted CHAID, classification and regression trees (CART), and C5.0 with adaptive boosting were applied. RESULTS: The RBF network implicated that the therapy arm and the baseline values of the WOMAC Index subscales might be the most important variables for the significant between-group differences of the WOMAC Index from baseline to 12 weeks in favor of Ayurveda. The intake of nutritional supplements in the Ayurveda group did not seem to be a significant factor in changes in the WOMAC Index. Ayurveda patients with functional limitations > 60 points and pain > 25 points at baseline showed the greatest improvements in the WOMAC Index from baseline to 12 weeks (mean value 107.8 ± 27.4). A C5.0 model with nine predictors had a predictive accuracy of 89.4% for a change in the WOMAC Index after 12 weeks > 10. With adaptive boosting, the accuracy rose to 98%. CONCLUSIONS: These secondary analyses suggested that therapeutic effects cannot be explained by the therapies themselves alone, although they were the most important factors in the applied models.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMDPI AGen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Medicineen_US
dc.subjectAyurvedaen_US
dc.subjectcomplementary medicineen_US
dc.subjectintegrative medicineen_US
dc.subjectknee osteoarthritisen_US
dc.subjecttraditional Indian medicineen_US
dc.titleAyurveda in Knee Osteoarthritis-Secondary Analyses of a Randomized Controlled Trial.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/jcm11113047
dc.identifier.pmid35683435
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of clinical medicine
dc.source.volume11
dc.source.issue11
dc.source.countrySwitzerland


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