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dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Lucine
dc.contributor.authorPerrin, Nancy
dc.contributor.authorCurriero, Frank C
dc.contributor.authorBlack, Maureen M
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Jerilyn K
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-14T15:22:49Z
dc.date.available2022-06-14T15:22:49Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/19163
dc.description.abstractFamily child care homes (FCCHs) are a favored child care choice for parents of young children in the U.S. Most FCCH providers purchase and prepare foods for the children in their care. Although FCCH providers can receive monetary support from the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), a federal subsidy program, to purchase nutritious foods, little is known about FCCH providers' access to nutritious foods, especially among FCCH providers serving children from communities that have been historically disinvested and predominantly Black. This study aims to describe the food desert status of FCCHs in Baltimore City, Maryland, and examine the relationship between food desert status and the quality of foods and beverages purchased and provided to children. A proportionate stratified random sample of 91 FCCH providers by CACFP participation status consented. Geographic information system mapping (GIS) was used to determine the food desert status of each participating FCCH. Participants reported on their access to food and beverages through telephone-based surveys. Nearly three-quarters (66/91) of FCCHs were located in a food desert. FCCH providers working and living in a food desert had lower mean sum scores M (SD) for the quality of beverages provided than FCCH providers outside a food desert (2.53 ± 0.81 vs. 2.92 ± 0.70, p = 0.036, respectively). Although the significant difference in scores for beverages provided is small, FCCH providers working in food deserts may need support in providing healthy beverages to the children in their care. More research is needed to understand food purchases among FCCH providers working in neighborhoods situated in food deserts.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116393en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMDPI AGen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen_US
dc.subjectGISen_US
dc.subjectbeveragesen_US
dc.subjectchildhood obesity preventionen_US
dc.subjectfamily child care homesen_US
dc.subjectfood desertsen_US
dc.subjectnutrition best practicesen_US
dc.titleFood Desert Status of Family Child Care Homes: Relationship to Young Children's Food Quality.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph19116393
dc.identifier.pmid35681977
dc.source.journaltitleInternational journal of environmental research and public health
dc.source.volume19
dc.source.issue11
dc.source.countrySwitzerland


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