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dc.contributor.authorPrice, Joan T
dc.contributor.authorVwalika, Bellington
dc.contributor.authorFrance, Michael
dc.contributor.authorRavel, Jacques
dc.contributor.authorMa, Bing
dc.contributor.authorMwape, Humphrey
dc.contributor.authorRittenhouse, Katelyn J
dc.contributor.authorDe Paris, Kristina
dc.contributor.authorHobbs, Marcia
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Julie A
dc.contributor.authorKasaro, Margaret P
dc.contributor.authorStringer, Elizabeth M
dc.contributor.authorStringer, Jeffrey S A
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-24T12:44:28Z
dc.date.available2022-05-24T12:44:28Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/18992
dc.description.abstractA Lactobacillus-deficient, anaerobe-rich vaginal microbiome has been associated with local inflammation and spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB), but few studies have assessed this association in the setting of HIV. We performed metagenomic sequencing and inflammatory marker assays on vaginal swabs collected in pregnancy. We grouped samples into 7 metagenomic clusters (mgClust) using the non-redundant VIRGO catalogue, and derived inflammatory scores by factor analysis. Of 221 participants, median Shannon diversity index (SDI) was highest in HIV+ with detectable viral load (1.31, IQR: 0.85–1.66; p < 0.001) and HIV+ with undetectable virus (1.17, IQR: 0.51–1.66; p = 0.01) compared to HIV− (0.74, IQR: 0.35–1.26). Inflammatory scores positively correlated with SDI (+ 0.66, 95%CI 0.28, 1.03; p = 0.001), highest among anaerobe-rich mgClust2–mgClust6. HIV was associated with predominance of anaerobe-rich mgClust5 (17% vs. 6%; p = 0.02) and mgClust6 (27% vs. 11%; p = 0.002). Relative abundance of a novel Gardnerella metagenomic subspecies > 50% predicted sPTB (RR 2.6; 95%CI: 1.1, 6.4) and was higher in HIV+ (23% vs. 10%; p = 0.001). A novel Gardnerella metagenomic subspecies more abundant in women with HIV predicted sPTB. The risk of sPTB among women with HIV may be mediated by the vaginal microbiome and inflammation, suggesting potential targets for prevention.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-12424-wen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relationIndividual de-identified participant data that underlie the results reported in this article are publicly available at Open Science Framework (https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/WT6Q8). Sequence read data have been deposited in the Sequence Read Archive (SRA) of the US National Institutes of Health (submission ID: SUB10306692).en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reportsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/WT6Q8en_US
dc.rights© 2022. The Author(s).en_US
dc.subjectmicrobial communitiesen_US
dc.subjectHIV infectionsen_US
dc.subjectpredictive markersen_US
dc.titleHIV-associated vaginal microbiome and inflammation predict spontaneous preterm birth in Zambia.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-022-12424-w
dc.identifier.pmid35595739
dc.source.journaltitleScientific reports
dc.source.volume12
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage8573
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryEngland


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