Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPineles, Beth L
dc.contributor.authorGoodman, Katherine E
dc.contributor.authorPineles, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorO'Hara, Lyndsay M
dc.contributor.authorNadimpalli, Gita
dc.contributor.authorMagder, Laurence S
dc.contributor.authorBaghdadi, Jonathan D
dc.contributor.authorParchem, Jacqueline G
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Anthony D
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-19T20:02:41Z
dc.date.available2022-05-19T20:02:41Z
dc.date.issued2022-04-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/18942
dc.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate whether pregnancy is an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality among patients of reproductive age hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) viral pneumonia. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study (April 2020-May 2021) of 23,574 female inpatients aged 15-45 years with an International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis code for COVID-19 discharged from 749 U.S. hospitals in the Premier Healthcare Database. We used a viral pneumonia diagnosis to select for patients with symptomatic COVID-19. The associations between pregnancy and in-hospital mortality, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and mechanical ventilation were analyzed using propensity score-matched conditional logistic regression. Models were matched for age, marital status, race and ethnicity, Elixhauser comorbidity score, payer, hospital number of beds, season of discharge, hospital region, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic pulmonary disease, deficiency anemias, depression, hypothyroidism, and liver disease. Results: In-hospital mortality occurred in 1.1% of pregnant patients and 3.5% of nonpregnant patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and viral pneumonia (propensity score-matched odds ratio [OR] 0.39, 95% CI 0.25-0.63). The frequency of ICU admission for pregnant and nonpregnant patients was 22.0% and 17.7%, respectively (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.15-1.55). Mechanical ventilation was used in 8.7% of both pregnant and nonpregnant patients (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.86-1.29). Among patients who were admitted to an ICU, mortality was lower for pregnant compared with nonpregnant patients (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.20-0.57), though mechanical ventilation rates were similar (35.7% vs 38.3%, OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.70-1.16). Among patients with mechanical ventilation, pregnant patients had a reduced risk of in-hospital mortality compared with nonpregnant patients (0.26, 95% CI 0.15-0.46). Conclusion: Despite a higher frequency of ICU admission, in-hospital mortality was lower among pregnant patients compared with nonpregnant patients with COVID-19 viral pneumonia, and these findings persisted after propensity score matching.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000004744en_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9015030/en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWolters Kluwer Healthen_US
dc.relation.ispartofObstetrics and Gynecologyen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.en_US
dc.titlePregnancy and the Risk of In-Hospital Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Mortality.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/AOG.0000000000004744
dc.identifier.pmid35576343
dc.source.journaltitleObstetrics and gynecology
dc.source.volume139
dc.source.issue5
dc.source.beginpage846
dc.source.endpage854
dc.source.countryUnited States


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record