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dc.contributor.authorKim, Christopher Y
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Hannah
dc.contributor.authorPeltier, Sandy
dc.contributor.authorSpitalnik, Steven L
dc.contributor.authorHod, Eldad A
dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Richard O
dc.contributor.authorHudson, Krystalyn E
dc.contributor.authorStone, Elizabeth F
dc.contributor.authorGordy, Dominique E
dc.contributor.authorFu, Xiaoyun
dc.contributor.authorZimring, James C
dc.contributor.authorAmireault, Pascal
dc.contributor.authorBuehler, Paul W
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Robert B
dc.contributor.authorD'Alessandro, Angelo
dc.contributor.authorShchepinov, Mikhail S
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Tiffany
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-17T13:12:09Z
dc.date.available2022-05-17T13:12:09Z
dc.date.issued2022-04-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/18872
dc.description.abstractBackground: Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are important modulators of red blood cell (RBC) rheology. Dietary PUFAs are readily incorporated into the RBC membrane, improving RBC deformability, fluidity, and hydration. However, enriching the lipid membrane with PUFAs increases the potential for peroxidation in oxidative environments (e.g., refrigerated storage), resulting in membrane damage. Substitution of bis-allylic hydrogens with deuterium ions in PUFAs decreases hydrogen abstraction, thereby inhibiting peroxidation. If lipid peroxidation is a causal factor in the RBC storage lesion, incorporation of deuterated linoleic acid (DLA) into the RBC membrane should decrease lipid peroxidation, thereby improving RBC lifespan, deformability, filterability, and post-transfusion recovery (PTR) after cold storage. Study Design and Methods: Mice associated with good (C57BL/6J) and poor (FVB) RBC storage quality received diets containing 11,11-D2-LA Ethyl Ester (1.0 g/100 g diet; deuterated linoleic acid) or non-deuterated LA Ethyl Ester (control) for 8 weeks. Deformability, filterability, lipidomics, and lipid peroxidation markers were evaluated in fresh and stored RBCs. Results: DLA was incorporated into RBC membranes in both mouse strains. DLA diet decreased lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde) by 25.4 and 31% percent in C57 mice and 12.9 and 79.9% in FVB mice before and after cold storage, respectively. In FVB, but not C57 mice, deformability filterability, and post-transfusion recovery were significantly improved. Discussion: In a mouse model of poor RBC storage, with elevated reactive oxygen species production, DLA attenuated lipid peroxidation and significantly improved RBC storage quality.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2022.868578en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.A.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Physiologyen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022 Kim, Johnson, Peltier, Spitalnik, Hod, Francis, Hudson, Stone, Gordy, Fu, Zimring, Amireault, Buehler, Wilson, D’Alessandro, Shchepinov and Thomas.en_US
dc.subjectRBCen_US
dc.subjectROSen_US
dc.subjectdeformabilityen_US
dc.subjectlipidomicsen_US
dc.subjectoxylipinsen_US
dc.subjectperoxidationen_US
dc.subjecttransfusionen_US
dc.titleDeuterated Linoleic Acid Attenuates the RBC Storage Lesion in a Mouse Model of Poor RBC Storage.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fphys.2022.868578
dc.identifier.pmid35557972
dc.source.journaltitleFrontiers in physiology
dc.source.volume13
dc.source.beginpage868578
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countrySwitzerland


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