Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorNouri, Aria
dc.contributor.authorTessitore, Enrico
dc.contributor.authorMolliqaj, Granit
dc.contributor.authorMeling, Torstein
dc.contributor.authorSchaller, Karl
dc.contributor.authorNakashima, Hiroaki
dc.contributor.authorYukawa, Yasutsugu
dc.contributor.authorBednarik, Josef
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Allan R
dc.contributor.authorVajkoczy, Peter
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Joseph S
dc.contributor.authorKwon, Brian K
dc.contributor.authorKurpad, Shekar N
dc.contributor.authorFehlings, Michael G
dc.contributor.authorHarrop, James S
dc.contributor.authorAarabi, Bizhan
dc.contributor.authorRahimi-Movaghar, Vafa
dc.contributor.authorGuest, James D
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Benjamin M
dc.contributor.authorKotter, Mark R N
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Jefferson R
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-24T15:04:07Z
dc.date.available2022-02-24T15:04:07Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/18097
dc.description.abstractStudy design: Narrative review. Objectives: To discuss the current understanding of the natural history of degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). Methods: Literature review summarizing current evidence pertaining to the natural history and risk factors of DCM. Results: DCM is a common condition in which progressive arthritic disease of the cervical spine leads to spinal cord compression resulting in a constellation of neurological symptoms, in particular upper extremity dysfunction and gait impairment. Anatomical factors including cord-canal mismatch, congenitally fused vertebrae and genetic factors may increase individuals' risk for DCM development. Non-myelopathic spinal cord compression (NMSCC) is a common phenomenon with a prevalence of 24.2% in the healthy population, and 35.3% among individuals >60 years of age. Clinical radiculopathy and/or electrophysiological signs of cervical cord dysfunction appear to be risk factors for myelopathy development. Radiological progression of incidental Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament (OPLL) is estimated at 18.3% over 81-months and development of myelopathy ranges between 0-61.5% (follow-up ranging from 40 to 124 months between studies) among studies. In patients with symptomatic DCM undergoing non-operative treatment, 20-62% will experience neurological deterioration within 3-6 years. Conclusion: Current estimates surrounding the natural history of DCM, particularly those individuals with mild or minimal impairment, lack precision. Clear predictors of clinical deterioration for those treated with non-operative care are yet to be identified. Future studies are needed on this topic to help improve treatment counseling and clinical prognostication.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1177/21925682211036071en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publications Inc.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Spine Journalen_US
dc.subjectcervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM)en_US
dc.subjectcord compressionen_US
dc.subjectossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL)en_US
dc.subjectprogressionen_US
dc.subjectrisk factorsen_US
dc.titleDegenerative Cervical Myelopathy: Development and Natural History [AO Spine RECODE-DCM Research Priority Number 2].en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/21925682211036071
dc.identifier.pmid35174726
dc.source.journaltitleGlobal spine journal
dc.source.volume12
dc.source.issue1_suppl
dc.source.beginpage39S
dc.source.endpage54S
dc.source.countryEngland


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record