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dc.contributor.authorCzekalski, Megan A
dc.contributor.authorHuziak, Rachelle C
dc.contributor.authorDurst, Andrea L
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorMai, Phuong L
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-21T14:57:25Z
dc.date.available2022-02-21T14:57:25Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/18046
dc.description.abstractWe received 170 evaluable responses. Eighty-five percent of providers always ordered genetic testing for patients with EOC. Most providers ordered germline multigene panel testing (95.8%), generally at diagnosis (64.5%). Provider confidence with the genetic testing process was generally high and significantly differed by providers' testing practices, namely, respondents who reported always ordering genetic testing tended to be more confident in ordering testing (P = .008), interpreting results (P = .005), and counseling a patient (P = .002). Patient disinterest and concerns for insurance coverage were commonly cited as barriers to testing and referrals.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1200/PO.21.00409en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Clinical Oncologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJCO Precision Oncologyen_US
dc.titleMainstreaming Genetic Testing for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer by Oncology Providers: A Survey of Current Practice.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1200/PO.21.00409
dc.identifier.pmid35025618
dc.source.journaltitleJCO precision oncology
dc.source.volume6
dc.source.beginpagee2100409
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States


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